Everett Chiropractic Center Blog

June 12, 2019

“Fasting” the movie (well documentary); Jason Fung, M.D.

It came out in 2017, but I only found out the other day.  A great movie, staring (among others) Jason Fung, M.D. this movie is comprehensive, so it has a lot of stuff that will not apply to most people. But it is a very good documentary. Easy to find on Netflix – I do not know about the rest of it.

Also, it is a little scary, by design. The sicker you are, the more risky anything you do is, in terms of reaction – you have to be careful who you listen to.

It is interesting that it did not take them long in the movie to refer to T. Colin Campbell (the plant-based diet guy) – though they never did mention his China Study.

Now I am reading Why We Sleep by Matthew Walker, PhD., another very good book. In it he didn’t get too far along before he was referencing the Greek island of Ikaria – with regard to napping (important!). He never did mention Blue Zones though, by name. It is one of the five blue zones.

Advertisements

May 28, 2019

Jason Fung, M.D.: Complete Guide to FASTING (2016)

From Chapter 2, A Brief History of Fasting, Modern Fasting

(probably page 68 but I am not sure)

“Fasting began to appear in the medical literature in the early 1900s. In 1915, an article in the Journal of Biological Chemistry described fasting as “a perfectly safe, harmless, and effective method for reducing the weight of those suffering from obesity.” However, in a time rife with poverty, infectious diseases, and war, obesity was hardly the problem it is today. Severe food shortages were present during the two world wars and the intervening Great Depression. Treatments for obesity were not a priority.

I the late 1950s, Dr. W. L. Bloom reignited interest in short-term fasting as a therapeutic measure, but longer periods were also well described in the literature. In a study published in 1968, Dr. I. C. Gilliland reported his experience with forty-six patients “whose reducing regime started with a standard absolute fast for 14 days.”

After the late 1960s, interest in therapeutic fasting seemed to again fade, mostly because obesity was still not a major public health issue. Coronary heart disease was the major health concern of the time, and nutritional research focused on dietary fat and cholesterol. Commercial interests also became pervasive, and as you might guess, large food corporations will not support any intervention that threatens their existence. So fasting as an adjunct to diet started to fade. Despite the fact that fasting is low-fat, as well as low-everything-else, it had almost entirely disappeared by the 1980s.”

[It might be good to read that again.]

April 17, 2019

“The Complete Guide to FASTING” by Jason Fung, MD

This from the section on Early Adopters, he also includes quotes by Benjamin Franklin and Mark Twain, after a longer section on the value of fasting among the early Greeks.

“One early fasting advocate was Hippocrates of Cos (c.460-c.370 BC), widely considered the father of modern medicine. In his lifetime, people came to the realization that obesity was an evolving and serious disease. Hippocrates wrote, ‘Sudden death is more common in those who are naturally fat than in the lean.’ He advised that treatment for obesity should include exertion after meals and eating a high-fat diet, and he recommended that ‘they should, moreover, eat only once in a day.’ In other words, incorporating a daily twenty-four hour fast was even then recognized as highly beneficial in the treatment of obesity. Proving once again that Hippocrates is worthy of our reverence, he also recognized the benefits of physical exercise and eating plenty of health fats in a health lifestyle.”

“Other intellectual giants throughout history were also great proponents of fasting. Paracelsus (1493-1541) a Swiss German physician and the founder of toxicology, famously wrote, ‘The dose makes the poison.'” A brilliant and transformative scientist, he also wrote, ‘Fasting is the greatest remedy – the physician within.”

 

April 2, 2019

“The Complete Guide to FASTING” by Jason Fung, MD – More on Spiritual Fasting

page 65

“In the Christian tradition, fasting and prayer are often methods of cleansing and renewing the soul. Symbolically, believers empty their souls so that they may be ready to receive God. Fasting is not so much about self-denial but about a reaching for spirituality and being able to commune with God and hear his voice. By fasting, you put your body under submission to the Holy Spirit, humble your sold before the presence of God, and prepare yourself to hear the voice of God.

Greek Orthodox Christians may follow various fasts on 180 to 200 days of the year. Famous nutrition teacher Ancel Keys often considered Creete the poster child for the healthy Mediterranean diet. However, there was a critically important factor of their diet that he completely dismissed: most of the population of Crete followed the Greek Orthodox tradition of fasting. The may have contributed to the healthy longevity of this population.
[My emphasis!]

Buddhist monks are know to abstain from eating after noon, fasting until the next morning. In addition, there may be water-only fasts for days or weeks on end. They fast to quench their human desires, which helps them rise above all desires order to achieve nirvana and and all suffering. This fits with their core beliefs in moderation and austerity.”

Actually, there is even more…

I don’t think it helps if you do not get the How-to-do and the What-to-do part. Below is a Brochure out of the Greek Orthodox church in Bellingham (St. Sophia Greek Orthodox Church has the annual festival with music, food, etc., and a tour of their church). It asks and answers the question: “Why do you fast so much?”

Here is their answer – I think that it is useful to know, not so we can copy it exactly, but so we can understand that principles at work, and get a general idea of what they do and how (the why is a big argument people can have face to face, not here):

“To clarify, fasting doesn’t mean giving up all food and water. Orthodox fasting practice, when followed strictly, means that not partaking of any animal products (e.i., meat, dairy, eggs, etc.), nor of olive oil or wine.

Fasting one of many tools that we use to bring our bodies “under subjugation” as St. Paul said (1 Cor. 9:27), so that we might be pure and holy. Jesus said that when He had gone, His followers would fast. Like the early Christians, we fast so that we may learn to control our appetite for all things that are not good and holy. It is not about earning salvation, it is a tool to help us work out our salvation with fear and trembling (Phill. 2:12), enabling us to train and strengthen our wills so that they can be turned toward Christ.

Specifically, we fast each Wednesday to commemorate the day when Jesus was betrayed and each Friday to commemorate His death on the cross. In addition, we fast during the entire Lenten period and the entire Advent period, as well as during other times of the year.”

March 31, 2019

“The Complete Guide to FASTING” by Jason Fung, MD – Introduction

page 64

Spiritual Fasting

“Fasting is widely practiced for spiritual reasons…”.

“In spiritual terms, it is often called cleansing or purification, but practically, it amounts to the same thing.”

“The practice of fasting developed…, …not as something that was harmful but as something that was deeply, intrinsically beneficial to the human body and spirit. Fasting is not so much a treatment for illness but a treatment for wellness. The regular application of fasting helps protect people from illness and keeps them feeling well.”

“In the story of Adam and Eve, the only act that is prohibited in the Garden of Eden is to eat the fruit of one tree, and Eve is tempted by the serpent to betray this trust. Fasting is thus act of turning away from temptation and back toward God.”

“In the Bible, Matthew 4:2 states, ‘Then Jesus was led by the Spirit into the wilderness to be tempted by the devil. After fasting forty days and forty nights, he was hungry.’ (I’ll mention here the interesting point that hunger often disappears during extended fast, which has been noted throughout history.)”

March 30, 2019

The Complete Guide to FASTING by Jason Fung, MD – Introduction

The by-line is “Heal Your Body Through Intermitten, Alternate-Day, and Extended Fasting”

Here I will share only a small sample from the book. You should get the book. You should get the book for sure if you do not know much about fasting.

If you do know something about fasting, the point of this book, I think is that we now need to put fasting in quotation marks. It probably no longer means whatever we used to think it meant. That by-line is a clue of course but, basically, given the beverages, and sometimes foods allowed on a “fast” we definitely have to re-think strict water fasts as the gold standard.

What I will share is some of the pages from his section on the history of fasting. I think that it is fascinating; you might learn something surprising.

The very most important message from research done over recent years is that you can access all of the benefits of fasting by simply extending the time between supper (or dinner if you prefer to call it that) and breakfast.

That is it. Stop right there. Not eating for 12 hours. And then more than 12 hours. That is it as your starting point. It will change your whole world (especially if you are sick and want to get well). And anyone can do that.

If you want to be healthy, this is how you do it. If you are healthy and want to stay that way, this is how you do it (part of how you do it, of course: you still have all the physical, chemical and mental stuff to do:-)

In the next Post I will share Doctor Fung’s words on “spiritual fasting”. It is amazing to come to understand the connection to The Mediterranean Diet. Mind boggling how revelation works.

March 29, 2019

“Intermittent Fasting” on the Front Page of BottomLine Personal (Jason Fung, M.D.)

Filed under: Be careful who you listen to!, Uncategorized — doctordilday @ 6:22 pm

[I thought that this was Posted months ago….]

I have been commenting to my patients that, now, everyone will be talking about it; and experts will come out of the woodwork.

Case in point: the January 15, 2019 BottomLine Personal – Front Page lead article.

It is a good review. I recommend that you get the books or watch the YouTube videos by Jason Fung, M.D. for details and best explanations. The BottomLine Personal article manages to do a decent job of summarizing his main points without ever mentioning his name… but she has clearly been following his work.

January 25, 2019

Intermittent Fasting Plus Lower-Calorie Diet May Be Best

Can you say, “Mediterranean Diet” or “Jason Fung, M.D.”?

This new study’s findings are consistent with both.

“Overweight women who ate a lower-calorie diet and fasted 3 days a week lost more weight and had better cardiometabolic markers than women who only reduced their calorie intake, or only fasted, or did neither in a small, 8-week randomized trial.

“Obese women who followed a diet in which they ate 70% of their required energy intake and fasted intermittently lost the most weight,” said lead author Amy T. Hutchison, post-doctoral researcher, Adelaide Medical School, University of Adelaide, Australia, in a statement from her university.”

January 16, 2019

How Fasting Can Improve Overall Health (think Jason Fung, M.D.)

Summary: Researchers report fasting affects the circadian rhythm of the liver and skeletal muscles, allowing them to rewire their metabolism. The study suggests fasting can help improve health and protect against aging related diseases.

Source: UC Irvine.

December 17, 2018

Jason Fung, M.D.: Fasting!

Filed under: Uncategorized — doctordilday @ 3:54 pm

December 7, 2018

Jason Fung, M.D.: The Complete Guide to Fasting

December 6, 2018

Jason Fung, M.D.: Solving the Two Compartment Problem with Fasting

Filed under: Uncategorized — doctordilday @ 4:45 pm
Older Posts »

Blog at WordPress.com.