Everett Chiropractic Center Blog

June 9, 2017

Foam Rolls

Filed under: Back pain, Exercise — Tags: , , , — doctordilday @ 1:54 pm

I am putting this here so that patients can find both the phone number and the description/item number to place Orders.

Power Systems

(800) 321-6975

Closed-Cell Foam Roller 36 in. Long X 6 in. diameter    $20.95

This may also be available on Amazon. I don’t know.

Teens and TV (in the bedroom)-> Obesity

http://neurosciencenews.com/obesity-tv-children-6836/

Think of it as a “risk factor”.

I was talking with a friend not too long ago about raising kids; his came out as near perfect and any parent could hope for. He took very little credit for it, in fact in one case he said that it was an honor even knowing that kid. Mostly, he said, it was about not messing it up.

His trick was to always use just one standard: what is in their best interest.

Not always easy, admittedly, but the consequences for indulging youthful excesses isn’t really that easy either. It is kind of like health: pay for health now, or pay for sickness later. Choose.

May 12, 2017

All NSAIDs Linked to Increased MI Risk: Medscape Article

Published in Medline, by Pauline Anderson, May 10, 2017

Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including naproxen, considered by some as one of the safest drugs in this class, is associated with a significantly increased risk for myocardial infarction (MI), results of a new patient-level meta-analysis show.

The analysis showed the heightened MI risk occurred as early as the first week of use and the risk was greater with higher doses.

“This new research on NSAIDs reinforces what physicians know already, that patients should use the smallest possible dose for the shortest possible time,” Michèle Bally, PhD, an epidemiologist in the Department of Pharmacy and Research Center, Centre hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal, Quebec, Canada, told Medscape Medical News.

Even though the research suggests the increased MI risk lessened over time, “the findings were not conclusive enough about longer duration,” said Dr Bally.

But for most patients, the risk is very small, she noted. “If you average people with different baseline heart risks, the risk specifically due to an NSAID is only about 1% per year, so out of 100 people treated continuously for a year, there will be one extra heart attack.”

The research was published online May 3 in BMJ.

Although previous studies have linked both traditional and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) selective NSAIDs to increased MI risk, the timing of the risk, the effect of dose and treatment duration, and the comparative risks between different drugs are poorly understood, the researchers note.

The recently reported Prospective Randomized Evaluation of Celecoxib Integrated Safety Vs Ibuprofen Or Naproxen (PRECISION) study found that at moderate doses, celecoxib was noninferior to ibuprofen or naproxen with regard to cardiovascular safety.

May 11, 2017

More Sleep and Caffeine Help With Pain

Filed under: Back pain, Be careful who you listen to!, General Health & Wellness — Tags: , , , — doctordilday @ 2:27 pm

http://neurosciencenews.com/caffeine-sleep-pain-6619/

 

May 10, 2017

Consumer Reports: Real Relief from Back Pain

WSDOTworker150x150   (How many safety features can you find on this WSDOT site photo – arguably the largest organization in the State dedicated to safety? Yet, he doesn’t bend over correctly at all.)

I keep forgetting to mention that the current issue of Consumer Reports features a cover story on back pain. It is a very good review of what most of mainstream medicine recommends, and therefore what most people are doing – the lack of effectiveness, cost, and risks associated with that approach. And it covers alternative methods of addressing back pain, the proven effectiveness (which is why it is the cover story), cost savings, and safety. All of that is old news if you have been reading this Blog long (and if you search any of the key words in this Post you will find many posts – there are over a thousand here – on that subject).

Two things are interesting to me about the article: what is right in plain sight, but missed entirely due to mindset; and how, still, the recommendations regarding how to bend and lift are erroneous – harmful even.

First, the mindset thing. Modern medicine is about treating symptoms: some will argue that but just look at what is said and what is the object of all the focus – back pain (a symptom) in this case, but it is everywhere all of the time if you look. And while they fairly accurately talk about the causes, they fail to conclude that substantially addressing these causes would be a means of preventing the symptom. Instead they point out, for example, that abnormal findings on X-rays is common among people who do not suffer with back pain. (That should be a clue, why isn’t it?)

Secondly, but related, is this whole business of correct bending and lifting technique – how could they get it so thoroughly wrong so consistently. How could they not connect the dots – remember the ‘they’ is the authoritative bodies of professional experts spewing opinions, guidelines, and recommendations (shifting gazillions of dollars within the economy)… but let’s not go down the cynical path.

I share all of this because we have a copy in the reception room – with the best parts highlighted (be me:-). Read it, but ignore the part about how to bend and lift, and talk with me about that.

DrD

March 30, 2017

A Memo On Preventing Back Pain Injury

I sent the following out just now… If you know an employer interested in preventing back injuries, please share it.

 

Greetings,

(You are getting this because either you have already shown an interest in preventing work place back injury, or there is some reason for me to belief that you might be interested.)

Last month the Annuals of Internal Medicine published the newest guidelines for the management of acute, sub-acute, and chronic low back pain (from the American College of Physicians).

You may be interested to know that Tai Chi made the list of recommendations.

Tai Chi has been referred to as “the perfect exercise”, and when researchers at the Mayo Clinic studied it in 2011, Tai Chi became their number one recommendation for Employee Wellness Programs. Researchers at the Harvard Medical School were so impressed that they wrote The Harvard Medical School Guide to Tai Chi in 2013.

I mention all of this because the epiphany that I had six years ago that I could help employers measure the risk of, and prevent, back injuries among their employees, was heavily informed by my, then, 15 years of Tai Chi practice. So far, while there has been expressed interest, my efforts to reach out have not resulted in meaningful conversations with those who have both the courage to advocate for a tested solution, and the authority to make a decision. (This is not about everyone doing Tai Chi: It is about measuring risk of back injury and then doing something about it that will measurably reduce that risk.)

My hope is that the growing impact of the problems of back pain injury (both direct costs and indirect costs) and the growing evidence of simple and efficient solutions will someday intersect with your priorities and the priorities of your employers. I would like to help, when/if that time comes.

Dennis Dilday, D.C.

Everett Chiropractic Center

Health – Naturally, through Chiropractic, Fitness & Whole-Food Nutrition

8625 Evergreen Way, #210

Everett, WA 98203

(425) 348-5207

http://www.doctordilday.com

March 26, 2017

For Tai Chi Students: Inspiration

http://taichivideos.org/90-year-old-performs-tai-chi-chuan/

 

 

February 21, 2017

For Tai Chi Students: More Good Stuff From The Past

Filed under: Back pain, Exercise, Tai Chi Chuan — Tags: , , , , — doctordilday @ 12:05 pm

February 20, 2017

Guest Post: Nina Williams on How You Can Avoid Injuries During Fitness Workouts

How You Can Avoid Injuries During Fitness Workouts

The push for fitness is a commendable stride but sometimes people sustain injuries as a result of failure to take precautions. Before any workout, there are routines that can be helpful while some others have significance as the workout progresses.

Source

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Here are useful tips that can be of help:

Use a Gear

As you go on a workout, there is a need to use protective gear where necessary. The sort of gear you will use depends on the routines you will be involved in. if you are going to lift weights, it is advised that you wear boots that grip.  This will give you firm feet on account of friction.

If you are going for sprints, make sure that you have running shoes. A specialty store can come in handy here and you can be given guidance on the best fit for your budget.

Do not also forget that your body weight, height and build will be considered when looking at the shoe that fits. Regular lifters also need hand gloves so that slips can be avoided.

Nutrition

What you eat is important when you are considering any exertion over a period of time. Some people will realize that they are burning fat as they exercise and sometimes the loss of water could mean less hydration too.

The loss of energy as the fat gets burned could lead to fainting in some cases and this explains the need for a balanced diet as workouts become regular.

Your muscles could fail when your energy levels get severely depleted and tissue damage might be inevitable as result. Post workout protein should be consumed for repairs to muscle fiber while not forgetting the pre-workout consumption of carbohydrates.

Rest

When you are considering how to motivate yourself to go to the gym, your fitness goals will be clear. As you plan for the routines to embark on, you should make provisions for adequate rest. This is certainly one way to prevent injuries when on a workout session and it is advisable to use breaks when you feel exhausted.

One way to avoid injuries is to take a day of rest each week as a preventive measure. It is not necessary to wait for physical injuries before taking a break. Since the human body needs to be maintained, observing rest is one way to get this done. Learn to observe your body rhythm and observe the pause when you get a signal.

Stretching

Your muscles need some stretching before you start any workout. This will make you more flexible and build resistance. This evidently aids in warding off injuries since you become more flexible.

After the workout, you also have a need to stretch the muscles that have been exercised and frayed. Getting them to loosen up is helpful and you need to ensure that it is done after each session.

Smart Decisions

Sometimes it is easy to forget that as each day passes, your ability to complete the same routines as you have done over the years gets dampened. Every person needs to be realistic about fitness goals and not be too fixated on high-sounding goals.

Getting too much done can be harmful and since consistency is what can keep you fit, make sure you adhere to a regular routine. Doing too much will lead to more injuries and reducing the workload is a necessary precaution.

 

Hydration

You need to keep a water bottle close so that you can maintain your hydration levels while you exercise. If you lose too much water and do not get replenished, you expose yourself to more injuries.

Do not shut down your fitness progression with careless dehydration. Avoid any damage and drink water before, during and after exercise.

Warm Up

When you do light routines before your normal workout, you can get warmed up as you should.  This will lead to the circulation of nutrients and blood that will make your workout possible.

If you can run, jump or skip some ropes for a few minutes, your body will get attuned for your workout.

Cross Train 

The cross trainer engages in a number of routines that are different in nature. This is one way to give your muscles a rest window instead of repeating the same process daily.

The rate of burning body fat is known to speed up as you change your routines and this is healthy for weight-loss.

You are also able to avoid the discouraging plateau that is inevitable when you repeat the same routines each day.

 

Use a personal Trainer

Depending on what your fitness goals might be, some workouts are such that you need help with them. Going the whole hog alone is not recommended all the time.

When you use a personal trainer, you will get useful hints and tips that will help you avoid injuries.

February 15, 2017

For Tai Students: Understanding Why We Push From The Heel

Deep and detailed, you can skim this and still get the gist. It is a long and complicated way of saying, “just do what we tell you,” in class.

Once this way of moving becomes habitual, you will continue to derive benefits in all areas of your life from then on. Kind of like most of the rest of the Tai chi that we teach.

NOTE: You are going to need this: 

Moment of a force/torque

A force whose line of action does not pass through the centre of gravity will cause the body to rotate and translate if it is unopposed – this turning effect is the moment of force.

Human movement is the consequence of an imbalance between the components of these forces that produce rotation; the capability of a force to produce this rotation is referred to as torque or moment of force.

The moment of force is the perpendicular distance from the force’s line of action to a specific point or axis of rotation.

Moment = force x distance

February 14, 2017

It just Keeps Getting Better… with Exercise

With some things (chiropractic, JuicePlus+, tai chi all come to mind), the more research there is, the more benefits get discovered.

Here exercise and it’s relation to eye sight come into better view: http://neurosciencenews.com/neuroscience-exercise-6111/

As if we need another reason to exercise.

January 25, 2017

Left Knee Pain

Today a patient wanted me to know that her left knee pain, a pain that she didn’t even tell me about (that part impressed her the most), went away immediately after her last visit – and she hasn’t had that pain since.

Patients often like to hold back from telling me what is bothering them when they come in for any particular visit; and I don’t always  ask. They like to see if I can ‘find’ it without them telling me. Then, when I do, they make a big deal out of that.

When we accept people as patients we try to explain that ours is an “alternative” approach. That we are looking for something (the subluxation complex), and if that have that, they can be a chiropractic patient – as long as it is safe for us to address the subluxation with what we do (in our case the Activator Method). If they do not have that particular condition, they do not qualify as a chiropractic patient; if it wouldn’t be safe to adjust them in the way that we do in this office, they still do not qualify as a chiropractic patient, in this office at least.

Most all of that is lost on most people. They hurt, that is the problem. And they think that it is critically important for them to tell us where they hurt for us to do our job. We go along with the conversation and keep trying to help them understand the difference between a symptom-based approach and the chiropractic approach. First patients have to feel better. We know that. The rest is a bonus.

 

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