Everett Chiropractic Center Blog

June 12, 2019

“Fasting” the movie (well documentary); Jason Fung, M.D.

It came out in 2017, but I only found out the other day.  A great movie, staring (among others) Jason Fung, M.D. this movie is comprehensive, so it has a lot of stuff that will not apply to most people. But it is a very good documentary. Easy to find on Netflix – I do not know about the rest of it.

Also, it is a little scary, by design. The sicker you are, the more risky anything you do is, in terms of reaction – you have to be careful who you listen to.

It is interesting that it did not take them long in the movie to refer to T. Colin Campbell (the plant-based diet guy) – though they never did mention his China Study.

Now I am reading Why We Sleep by Matthew Walker, PhD., another very good book. In it he didn’t get too far along before he was referencing the Greek island of Ikaria – with regard to napping (important!). He never did mention Blue Zones though, by name. It is one of the five blue zones.

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June 11, 2019

Jason Fung, M.D. – Excerpt from “The Diabetes Code”

page 149 and 150

“…meta-analyses reviewing all the available literature up to 2016, including twenty randomized controlled trials, could only conclude that ‘there is no significant evidence of long term efficacy of insulin on any clinical outcomes in T2D (type 2 diabetes). However, there is a trend clinically harmful adverse effects such as hypoglycemia and weight gain.’ In other words, insulin treatment, including medications that simulate only the glucose-lowering properties of insulin, carries no perceptible benefits and significant risks. Insulin is “significantly more harmful than other active treatments.” (Emphasis mine!)

If you are on insulin or pre-diabetic you might want to go back and read that again, meanwhile… there is more.

page 150

“A similar review in the Journal of the American Medical Association that included all relevant trials up to 2016 found that none of the drug classes considered, including metformin, SUs, TZDs, and DPP-4 inhibitors, reduced cardiovascular disease or other complications.”

“While the scientific evidence is crystal clear, diabetes guidelines are slow to reflect this new reality. “… 95 percent of published guidelines endorsed the use of diabetes drugs despite the nonexistent benefits.”

“The classic medical treatment, which relies almost exclusively on pharmaceuticals to reduce blood glucose, can therefore best be described as how not to treat type 2 diabetes.”

“Following the low-fat, calorie-restricted diet and increasing exercise have long been the recommended lifestyle treatment for type 2 diabetes. There is only one problem with this seeming common sense advice. It doesn’t work at all.”

June 1, 2019

Seth Godin Clearing Things Up

Justifying mediocre work

The list of reasons is nearly endless.

We need all of them to explain the shortcuts, phone-ins and half-work that we’re surrounded by.

All of them are pretty good reasons too. We’re in a hurry, the system is unfair, the market demands it, no one will notice, it’s not my job, I was handed a lousy spec, the materials are second-rate, the market won’t pay for quality, competition is cutthroat, my boss is a jerk, it’s actually pretty good, no one appreciates the good stuff anyway…

On the other hand, there’s only one way to justify work that’s better than it needs to be: Because you cared enough.

May 31, 2019

Burger King’s Impossible Burger

This is what is being build in the lot next to where our office is right now – I think. Here, read all about it:https://www.marketwatch.com/story/beyond-meat-is-a-disruptor-as-plant-based-meat-industry-sales-poised-to-reach-100-billion-2019-05-28?mod=mw_share_facebook&fbclid=IwAR3J7xdb_oG8iS1brXAygs3-a7iqRKgPnvPIWepdje825sUfLV56aWUfU7k

Parking will improve soon, too, I am sure:-)

 

Jason Fung, M.D. : Newly Published Research

I put this under ‘Jason Fung, M.D.’ on the Blog because it is new, and because it is research on Diabetes. But it has nothing to do with him: unless you have read his books and recognize a pattern.

This is ‘research’ in which we are supposed to read the headline, but never actually digest the small print – and it is written in such a way that it is not easy to digest even if you can. Read the last sentence of this Post. Dig into the article only if you think that you can appreciate what is, and what is not, being said. Then disregard all of it and go back and re-read Jason Fungs’ books.

Taken from Medscape

New Diabetes Cases in US Fall by 35% After 20-Year Rise

Miriam E. Tucker

May 30, 2019

“Rates of diagnosed diabetes in the United States may finally be declining but overall numbers remain high, new findings suggest.

The analysis of data for an almost 40-year period (1980-2017) from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) was published online May 28 in BMJ Open Diabetes Research and Care by Stephen R. Benoit, MD, and colleagues from the Division of Diabetes Translation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, Georgia.

After nearly a two-decade increase in both prevalence and incidence of diagnosed diabetes in the United States, the prevalence — the number of people living with diagnosed diabetes — has stabilized for the past 8 years and there has been a decrease in incidence, driven mostly by that seen among non-Hispanic whites.

This reduction means new cases declined by 35% from 2008 to 2017, a sign, perhaps, that efforts to stop the nation’s diabetes epidemic are working, say the researchers.

However, they caution, “Causes of the plateauing of prevalence and decrease in incidence are unclear and although the trends are encouraging, the overall burden of diabetes remains high and warrants continued intervention and monitoring.””

May 30, 2019

“Beyond Measure” – A Book Review

Beyond Measure (2015), by Vicki Abeles and Grace Rubinstein, is about rescuing an “over scheduled, over tested, underestimated generation”. It followed a documentary, also done by the author, called “Race to Nowhere.”

The issues of the current generation trying to become adults spills over into the conversations we have with patients – and their kids (they are all patients:-).

I had no idea the magnitude of the problem. Yes, we have – for years – talked about the heavy back packs; and now, of course we talk about “text neck”. That is the tip of the iceberg.

I would say that if you have school-aged kids, or will have, or they or their parents are in your life at all, this would be a book for you. It is well written, and though the authors spend a lot of print on the problem – details meant to convince and compel, which I do not need, but you may.

Here I would just like to share quotes that struck me.

“nature-deficit disorder” on page 79 – it becomes a health issue very quickly.

Meaningless (school work) leaving the kids with no sense of purpose. “Change the system not just the symptoms”. (They do a great job of getting to cause.)

“deep learning is as much about the process as it is about the product.

Become a “Rat Racer in Recovery” page 197. They do this a lot – it helps with retention:-)

“An act of cultural defiance” breaking old habit and familiar patterns – in maintaining balance – referring to digital detox.

“Define success with wellness at the core.” There is an idea that I can get behind!

In reclaiming a runaway schedule: ask what matter most (to yourself, and the kids – ask them the question).

Peace has to precede wellness – first measure of successful parenting – who they are verse what they do.

Focus on real connection

School work should be done at school.

“There is more than one path to a meaningful life.”

This whole book is about “project-based learning” as an alternative to what kids experience currently.

“Frustrated beyond function”

“A problem shrouded in silence a decade ago.”

“Childhood is not a race: say ‘no, it’s not a race'”.

“The most important lessons and qualities can not be measured – insisting on measuring them will never lead kids to thrive.”

Chapter 8, First Be Well – “The deliberate promotion of children’s wellbeing”, “Beyond healthy – strive toward happy”, Prevention: social and emotional learning; positive psychology (University of Pennsylvania, Martin Seligman); and… mindfulness (See 2014 cover of TIME magazine)

The coordinator of mental health services and outreach at Harvard started offering mindfulness classes in student dorms and found it to be the “single most effective tool” he’s encountered in his work so far.” Page 198

This hits home for me, of course, as a Tai Chi instructor, both at the local Community College, and a local gym. Mindfulness, relaxation, and developing both external and internal awareness, is at the very heart of Tai Chi.

I would like to end with a quote from the front cover of the book: “America. This is your wake-up call. With both heart and smarts, Vicki Abeles showcases the courageous communities that are rejecting the childhood rat race and reclaiming health and learning. Our kids really need us to listen.” – MARIE SHRIVER

May 29, 2019

The Big Three

Scroll down a ways and you will find a Post for each of the Big Three exercises…

Start here: https://doctordilday.wordpress.com/2015/07/

May 28, 2019

Jason Fung, M.D.: Complete Guide to FASTING (2016)

From Chapter 2, A Brief History of Fasting, Modern Fasting

(probably page 68 but I am not sure)

“Fasting began to appear in the medical literature in the early 1900s. In 1915, an article in the Journal of Biological Chemistry described fasting as “a perfectly safe, harmless, and effective method for reducing the weight of those suffering from obesity.” However, in a time rife with poverty, infectious diseases, and war, obesity was hardly the problem it is today. Severe food shortages were present during the two world wars and the intervening Great Depression. Treatments for obesity were not a priority.

I the late 1950s, Dr. W. L. Bloom reignited interest in short-term fasting as a therapeutic measure, but longer periods were also well described in the literature. In a study published in 1968, Dr. I. C. Gilliland reported his experience with forty-six patients “whose reducing regime started with a standard absolute fast for 14 days.”

After the late 1960s, interest in therapeutic fasting seemed to again fade, mostly because obesity was still not a major public health issue. Coronary heart disease was the major health concern of the time, and nutritional research focused on dietary fat and cholesterol. Commercial interests also became pervasive, and as you might guess, large food corporations will not support any intervention that threatens their existence. So fasting as an adjunct to diet started to fade. Despite the fact that fasting is low-fat, as well as low-everything-else, it had almost entirely disappeared by the 1980s.”

[It might be good to read that again.]

May 26, 2019

Tai Chi is a Martial Art: It Fights Stress – Now Popular with Millennials

https://www.cnn.com/2017/09/05/health/tai-chi-millennials/index.html?fbclid=IwAR37xA1Niy-OYAFEh5gTt-Fk218wXHPK5RBK82LJGIhQgTs8IzY9XmAEM1s

May 24, 2019

Cervipedic Neck-Relief Model M2

And in the upright position (think recliner…)

And…converting to sleep or gentle mode.

May 23, 2019

For Tai Chu Students: Paul Silfverstråle

Here is the newest offering by Swedish tai chi elder brother,  Paul Silfverstråle.

May 22, 2019

Said Like Only Seth Godin Can

He always writes what I am thinking – only much more eloquently.

This will take two hours

We have so many forms of “this will only take a minute” inputs.

We have Slack, which is optimized for, “yep, I saw that.”

We have email, which is optimized for, “I cleared my inbox” or possibly, “I’ll do this later.”

We have Twitter, which is optimized for wasting time.

And we have Facebook, which in only a few minutes, can make you feel left out.

But we don’t have a convention for important inputs that might take hours of work to respond to.

We don’t have a pre-sorted inbox for, “I’m ready to think deeply and work hard and change my posture and truly engage with this idea now.”

This is one of the best things about a good non-fiction book. It’s not for wasting time, it’s for depth when you’re ready to go deep.

If you spend your whole day browsing, then what happens?

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