Everett Chiropractic Center Blog

August 16, 2019

Quit Smoking!

I know that these is a very nice graphic with this info on it but, for now, here is an article that details what and how fast your body responds to stopping smoking.

It is amazing!

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July 18, 2019

WHY NASAL BREATHING IS ESSENTIAL FOR YOUNG ATHLETES

A great interview with the author of Oxygen Advantage, Patrick McKeown. (From TrainHeroic)

Earlier Posts on mouth breathing issues and nasal breathing benefits (including the one I titled, “Priority #1 Video (Breathing)” which is amazing).

It couldn’t get much more important than this.

June 25, 2019

Twelve Tips for Healthy Sleep

These are from Why We Sleep, by Matthew Walker, PhD. He got them from NIH Magazine Plus (Internet) [I edited some of it… they were wordy]

  1. Stick to a sleep schedule. Go to bed and wake up at the same time each day.
  2. Exercise is great, but not too late in the day. … not later than two to three hours before your bedtime.
  3. Avoid caffeine and nicotine. Caffeine can ‘take as long as eight hours to wear off.’
  4. Avoid alcoholic drinks before bed. (He talks about sedation not being the same as sleeping.)
  5. Avoid large meals and beverages late at night.
  6. If possible, avoid medications that delay or disrupt your sleep. Some can be taken at a different time of the day.
  7. Don’t take naps after 3 p.m. Naps can make up for lost sleep but late afternoon naps can make it harder to fall asleep at night. (Naps are good. He did a whole section on that, but too late not so good.)
  8. Relax before bed.
  9. Take a hot bath before bed. (There is a whole chapter on temperature and getting to sleep quick – important and simple to implement.)
  10. Dark bedroom, cool bedroom, gadget-free bedroom. He offers tricks.
  11. Have the right sunlight exposure – get bright sun in the morning, early part of the day; turn down the lights as bedtime approaches.
  12. Don’t lie in bed awake. He says get up and do something relaxing if lying in bed awake for more then twenty minutes makes you feel anxious or worried. I say breathe and ‘follow your breath’. (Mentally ‘notice’ your breath and keep you mind on that one thing. Look at the Blog Posts on breath and breathing ¬†to fill in the details. Essentially, you will be meditating; and asleep before you know it.

March 1, 2019

“Follow The Breath to Enter the Zone”

I put that in quotes because it comes from a book by Patrick McKeown entitled, The Oxygen Advantage. I share it because it is almost the exact verbiage I have use to teach tai chi students how to breath – in their first class. He didn’t get it from me; and I didn’t get it from him. It is fundamental to healthy breathing, as a starting spot. In tai chi it is part of getting centered and grounded before embarking of the journey that is the tai chi Hand Form. On this Blog I have also talked endlessly about the benefits of proper breathing; and the consequences of not doing so.

Here are his words…

“Following the breath involves observing the cycle of each inhalation and exhalation, and is a simple and useful method of internalizing your focus while shutting out any unnecessary thoughts. …

… The breath is the bridge between the mind and the body

February 22, 2019

Box Breathing (Calms you down)

If the Navy Seals do it and first responders do it, it must be good, right? Here is a link on “Box Breathing”.

I am currently reading “Oxygen Advantage” by Patrick McKeown. In it he talks about breathing techniques that simulate high altitude training and high intensity training. He mentioned the best example of perfect breathing he has encountered: it was in an advanced tai chi person – big surprise.

It is all Tai Chi to me.

To learn more about the importance of breathing correctly: how, why, when, etc., come to tai chi class or search ‘breathing’ on this Blog. It really is important; it really is simple.

DrD

December 4, 2018

For Tai Chi Students: Our Elder Sisters in France

*** Local Caption *** CONDAMINE (luce)

*** Local Caption *** CONDAMINE (luce)

I think that it is important to know who you are associated with.

Here are two who represent an impressive standard. I think that you will enjoy knowing more about them and their journey.

July 7, 2018

Experiencing a Stressful Day May Lower Cognitive Abilities Throughout the Day

Summary: Waking up feeling stressed and anxious can impact your cognitive function throughout the day, researchers report. A new study reveals those who woke up feeling as though the day ahead would be stressful experienced problems with working memory later in the day. Researchers say the anticipation of stress impacts cognition, even if a stressful event does not occur.

Source: Penn State.

June 22, 2018

What’s this “may” business!

“Mindful Movement May Lower Stress and Anxiety”

June 15, 2018

Mindfulness Meditation and Relaxation Response Have Different Effects on Brain Function

Whenever I read about studies having to do with these or other related subjects (e.g., rehab, fitness training, self-defense tactics), I am struck by the fact that they are really researching Tai chi. (Here is the link to the discussion of the Study that provoked this Post.) Grey Cook’s book, Movement comes to mind as a classic example.

Tai Chi Chuan (the “Chuan” connotes the martial aspects of the discipline) is all of these things simultaneously; and more. People that I speak with know that I am a Tai Chi guy, so they just chalk it up to my enthusiasm. Some people, though, who are in the middle of the world of related research are able to appreciate the “complete” nature of Tai Chi Chuan.

Of course not all Tai Chi is equal: you have to have good instruction; and you have to practice correctly. But training within a traditional Tai Chi syllabus under good instruction provides as complete a system of exercise and self-defense, including all aspects of exercise (including rehab) as a person is going to find.

 

March 28, 2018

Breath

Arefa Cassoobhoy, MD, MPH

DISCLOSURES

January 19, 2018

 

play

00:00
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01:01

FS

“Hello. I’m Dr Arefa Cassoobhoy, a practicing internist, Medscape advisor, and senior medical director for WebMD. Welcome to Morning Report, our 1-minute news story for primary care.

In patients with asthma, breathing exercises are known to help. But training patients in breathing techniques takes time and expertise, so it’s not often utilized to manage uncontrolled asthma.

A recent trial[1] compared two methods of breathing retraining: self-taught, using a video; or three face-to-face sessions with a respiratory therapist. The training focused on diaphragmatic breathing, nasal breathing, and slow breathing, as well as controlled breath holds and simple relaxation exercises.

Compared with usual care, both methods of breathing retraining improved asthma-related quality of life. Although the interventions didn’t change measures of airway inflammation or obstruction, patients reported increased control over breathing and reduced need for medication. They also felt more relaxed.

So, for your patients struggling with their asthma, consider adding breathing retraining to their treatment. Even patients who don’t have easy access to respiratory therapists can benefit from the self-taught video training. It’s a simple, low-cost option.”

The emphasis above is mine: this is all taught in your first tai chi class, and constantly repeated, and re-enforced, throughout each and every tai chi class. Most people, asthmatics or not, will benefit from learning diaphragmatic breathing, through the nose in a mindful way that produces relaxation.

March 12, 2018

Is Your Stress Changing My Brain?

This connection is so intuitive that is should go without saying: but this is what science is for.

October 5, 2017

What is the point of a Nobel Prize?

Well, it is too honor the contribution of the folks who receive the prize. But it is also to apply what has been learned to our daily lives – and thereby enrich those lives – or that might be one point, anyway.

So think about this year’s Nobel prize in terms of what it means to do all the things that people do that messes with their circadian rhythms – because it is profoundly impactful to their health and well fair.

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