Everett Chiropractic Center Blog

October 25, 2017

“I had no idea chiropractic was covered by insurance.”

That from today’s new patient. If you know anyone suffering from back pain, neck pain, or headaches (or knee pain, or shoulder pain, or… or…), you would be doing them a great service to mention that chiropractic might help them.

A chiropractic patient is qualified as a chiropractic patient because they need chiropractic care, not because of their complaints, or lack of complaints.

We look for a condition that is often no painful – it will likely eventually become painful. It may be painful, it may not. The condition we look for and attempt to prevent, correct, or manage is a progressive condition: it will get worse if it is left uncared for. It will lead to degenerative changes, eventually. And this process will lead to disease labels.

If a patient waits too long, there may be little that chiropractic care can do. But you will not know that without an examination, and usually a trial of care.

And if someone you know, work with or are related to is suffering, does have the condition that chiropractors look for and correct, and does not get chiropractic care, there is a good chance that, symptom relief or not, they will still have that condition afterwards. By this I mean medication, physical therapy, massage, may give symptomatic relief; if may not correct the underlying condition causing the symptoms.

It is an old story. We who have been telling it for decades tend to assume everyone knows it. But like insurance coverage, which has been standard for chiropractic care since the early 70’s, not everyone knows.

You need to tell them.

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October 24, 2017

TED talk on why we have a brain

October 20, 2017

Stroke Risk Factors Going Up…

From a new Study…

And, keep in mind, I wouldn’t be talking about this if it were not all preventable. Managing risk factors is the epitome of prevention.

October 16, 2017

I Am Not The Only One Who Gets Frustrated

hip-hinge

 

Here, an elder tai chi brother of mine from Brussels, Wim Demeere, goes off on the subject of poorly trained professional athletes.

Is it any wonder that the average guy or gal on the street, working, recreating, and performing all the activities of life doesn’t have a clue how to move correctly. They merrily march on toward their next (or first) episode of injurious pain.

Notice: he doesn’t break the Knee Rule; he maintains Neutral Spine (Even in the neck!). And he pointing to his heels – where the majority of the weight lands.

And, finally, notice that he talks about the “Hip Crease” – of the three Elements of Bending & Lifting, this is the KEY element: without it you can not achieve the other two.

October 14, 2017

The Godfather of Fitness

I was just looking for a Jack LaLanne quote, which I found at Wikipedia, of course.

Reading the story on Jack LaLanne (a Chiropractic Doctor, by the way), I am just struck by what an amazing example he was. I remember as a child in the 60’s doing the floor exercises with my mother… In the 70’s his name and story were there as I read the works of Paul Bragg. In the 80′ his name always came up in the bodybuilding, muscle and fitness magazines that I read. I think it was the 90’s that he was famous as the juicing celebrity – not to mention the feats of strength that he would perform as he celebrated each decade of life – stunts that no one attempts to duplicate (that I know of).

He was something.

Oh, and the quote that I was looking for? It is the last sentence of this longer quote of his:

“Dying is easy. Living is a pain in the butt. It’s like an athletic event. You’ve got to train for it. You’ve got to eat right. You’ve got to exercise. Your health account, your bank account, they’re the same thing. The more you put in, the more you can take out. Exercise is king and nutrition is queen: together, you have a kingdom.”

July 12, 2017

Pony Tails and Headaches

http://neurosciencenews.com/headache-ponytails-7065/

 

 

July 5, 2017

Maybe you too?

“I feel amazing” she said. And “doing stuff that I haven’t done in years… and on my knees too!”

When I met this patient in December of last year, it was: “I sometimes have to pull over…” while driving due to knee pain. She said that her back was “always really tight” and it had been that way for two years.

Now?

She is going a month between visits. She knows how to brace and breathe, and how to bend and lift, as well as get up and down off the ground. She does the exercises to keep the joints that I adjust moving between visits; and she is helping her husband build a 40 foot deck – with no pain anywhere!

This is a woman who has had back surgery for lower back disc herniations – twice.

Not every patient does this well. Not all chiropractors check and adjust hip, knee, and ankle/foot joints. But all chiropractors who use the Activator Method properly can check all the joints. If you need help finding a decent chiropractor in your area, just let me know. Maybe I can help.

And if you are within striking distance of Everett, WA., then give us a call at (425) 348-5207.

July 4, 2017

Spear Chiropractic Hospital

I attended a seminar in Olympia this past weekend. It was noteworthy in that we were reminded of a history that includes the Spears Clinic. A step back in time.

June 26, 2017

Genesis 3:2

The Medscape article below reminds me of that verse. By starting with a rhetorical question based on a lie, the author plants doubt. By being “more crafty than any other beast of the field” (Genesis 3:1), authors can put ideas in our heads with subtle insinuation, association, and other techniques, leading us to arrive at conclusions and beliefs that the author prefers. Here the article is a fine article as far as the facts go – but the article doesn’t really go far enough; by starting and ending with a physical therapist, one is supposed to be left with a certain idea about what the basis of choosing between these different provider types ought to be. That needs to be thought through a couple of more steps.

Spinal Manipulation for Back and Neck Pain: Does It Work?

Spinal Manipulation: A Valid Technique?

In her office at McMaster University in Toronto, Anita Gross, MSc, has logged paper after paper showing that spinal manipulation can help control neck pain. “The evidence keeps growing and growing,” she says.

Gross, a physiotherapist and associate professor of rehabilitation science, helped write a 2015 Cochrane review of the literature and is already at work on updating that paper.[1]

Mounting evidence also supports spinal manipulation for low back pain, says Roger Chou, MD, professor of medicine at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland, Oregon, who led a similar review for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality last year.[2]

 Orthopedists can confidently refer many neck and back patients for this type of treatment when surgery is not indicated, these and other experts agree. The findings counter decades of accusations of quackery mounted against healers who massage or manipulate patients’ muscles or joints.

But other therapies, particularly exercise, may work just as well. And the research so far leaves big questions unanswered. For example, does one technique for spinal manipulation work better than another? What is the mechanism of these techniques? Are patients better off being treated by physical therapists, chiropractors, osteopathic physicians, massage therapists, or some other category of practitioner? How long should a patient keep trying spinal manipulation before deciding that no more benefits are likely?

Osteopathic vs Chiropractic Approaches

Spinal manipulation—along with manual therapy involving other anatomical structures—has evolved over thousands of years, starting with bone-setting practices that probably preceded recorded history. Mention can be found in ancient Egyptian and Chinese texts, as well as in the writings of Hippocrates.[3,4]

Two prominent traditions in the United States arose in the late 19th century, when Andrew Taylor Still, MD, a physician and surgeon, founded osteopathy and osteopathic medicine, and Daniel David Palmer, a practitioner of magnet healing (a pseudoscientific alternative medicine practice), founded chiropractic.

These founders cited different influences: Palmer ascribed his knowledge to visitations from the spirit world,[5] whereas Dr Still made a more conventional study of both allopathic and alternative medicine current in his day. (Because Dr Still’s publications preceded Palmer’s, some authorities have speculated that Palmer based his approach on Dr Still’s.[3]) The founders of both modalities believed that they could treat not only joint and muscle pain, but also many other apparently unrelated ailments.

Perhaps because of the differences in their founders’ inspirations, chiropractic and osteopathy have diverged. In the United States, osteopathic medical schools now resemble allopathic medical schools, although musculoskeletal manipulation therapy remains part of the curriculum. Osteopathic physicians in the United States have the same scope of practice as medical doctors. Many don’t practice manual therapy at all, and most of those who do confine those therapies to treatment of musculoskeletal and neuromuscular disorders. In many other countries, there are osteopaths who practice manual therapies but not medicine.

Chiropractors in most US states cannot prescribe drugs or perform surgery. Some focus entirely on manual therapy, whereas many others incorporate other modes of alternative medicine into their practices, such as herbal medicine or acupuncture. Some chiropractors confine themselves to musculoskeletal and neuromuscular disorders, especially for back pain, but others treat a broader range of disorders.

Physical therapists and physiatrists may also use manual therapy, including spinal manipulation, among other techniques.

June 9, 2017

Teens and TV (in the bedroom)-> Obesity

http://neurosciencenews.com/obesity-tv-children-6836/

Think of it as a “risk factor”.

I was talking with a friend not too long ago about raising kids; his came out as near perfect and any parent could hope for. He took very little credit for it, in fact in one case he said that it was an honor even knowing that kid. Mostly, he said, it was about not messing it up.

His trick was to always use just one standard: what is in their best interest.

Not always easy, admittedly, but the consequences for indulging youthful excesses isn’t really that easy either. It is kind of like health: pay for health now, or pay for sickness later. Choose.

June 6, 2017

Hearing What Isn’t Said

 

Yesterday a new patient with a fairly typical bad low back story, told me that he wasn’t much for going to doctors. His current episode of back pain was just about over – the pain was worse when he made the appointment – and he is getting good physical therapy (they recommended he come here).

He had already told me about his lifestyle, which is good: diet conscious – with a full garden, fit, and active – a thoughtful guy. I suggested that there is another way to think of doctoring when it comes to chiropractic: more like exercise, something that he would never think of starting and then not continuing in the sense that he might not want to continue “going to doctors.”

It was an attempt on my part. Today my first phone message was him saying that he has had a change of heart, and cancelling his next appointment.

It occurs to me that he heard something that I did not say, namely that, like exercise, he would need to come in for chiropractic care often (like exercise). He missed the point, failed to stay in the conversation long enough to get clarification, and may end up missing out on the benefits of chiropractic care.

After that message my first patient arrived. A guy who started his care here 7 weeks ago and has no symptoms at all now – hasn’t for weeks. He has been shown and is compliant with doing the things that will help him hold his adjustments (keep the joints that I adjust moving properly). He was shown how to properly bend and lift (knee rule, neutral spine, and hip hinge) and how to get up and down off the ground safely (knee rule) – something that he needed. And he as been given the exercises he needs to work on spinal stabilization (core strength) if he wants to.

He now goes two weeks between visits, and soon will be going a month between visits. It is possible that someday he will go three months between visits, enjoying little to no symptoms, and fully confident that every day he is using his back properly and maintaining his health. He is using chiropractic like exercise: regularly, and for the right reasons.

 

May 10, 2017

Consumer Reports: Real Relief from Back Pain

WSDOTworker150x150   (How many safety features can you find on this WSDOT site photo – arguably the largest organization in the State dedicated to safety? Yet, he doesn’t bend over correctly at all.)

I keep forgetting to mention that the current issue of Consumer Reports features a cover story on back pain. It is a very good review of what most of mainstream medicine recommends, and therefore what most people are doing – the lack of effectiveness, cost, and risks associated with that approach. And it covers alternative methods of addressing back pain, the proven effectiveness (which is why it is the cover story), cost savings, and safety. All of that is old news if you have been reading this Blog long (and if you search any of the key words in this Post you will find many posts – there are over a thousand here – on that subject).

Two things are interesting to me about the article: what is right in plain sight, but missed entirely due to mindset; and how, still, the recommendations regarding how to bend and lift are erroneous – harmful even.

First, the mindset thing. Modern medicine is about treating symptoms: some will argue that but just look at what is said and what is the object of all the focus – back pain (a symptom) in this case, but it is everywhere all of the time if you look. And while they fairly accurately talk about the causes, they fail to conclude that substantially addressing these causes would be a means of preventing the symptom. Instead they point out, for example, that abnormal findings on X-rays is common among people who do not suffer with back pain. (That should be a clue, why isn’t it?)

Secondly, but related, is this whole business of correct bending and lifting technique – how could they get it so thoroughly wrong so consistently. How could they not connect the dots – remember the ‘they’ is the authoritative bodies of professional experts spewing opinions, guidelines, and recommendations (shifting gazillions of dollars within the economy)… but let’s not go down the cynical path.

I share all of this because we have a copy in the reception room – with the best parts highlighted (be me:-). Read it, but ignore the part about how to bend and lift, and talk with me about that.

DrD

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