Everett Chiropractic Center Blog

September 22, 2019

For Tai Chi Students: Separate Feet (Othmar)

Shi San International

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September 20, 2019

Happy 100th Birthday

No, not chiropractic, that was yesterday (124 years!!)

This is the cake from a party that I attended on Sunday.

unnamed

How cool is that!?

Seth Godin (He Keeps Getting Better)

At saying what shouldn’t need to be said in the first place!

“I know it’s bad – but everyone’s doing it”

The optimists who got excited about the ‘everyone has a microphone’ promise of the Net 20 years ago overlooked two flaws in human nature:

First, given sufficient reward (money, attention, fame, notoriety) some people will show up and say and do things that they know are wrong.

Second, if enough people are in the first group of bottom fishers, many other people may decide that those behaviors aren’t as wrong as they thought they were. The internet ends up normalizing bad behavior, because bad behavior captures our attention and gets noticed. We multiply the outliers in our imagination and come to the erroneous conclusion that their behavior is common, when it actually isn’t.

There are two ways forward, and both are up to us: First, we can start paying more attention (rewarding) good behavior. And second, we can start modeling precisely the sort of discourse and contributions we hope to see from others.

The best antidote to a culture shifting to bad behavior is to re-normalize good behavior.

How To Make the Simple Complicated, And Then Profit From It

Notice who will profit. 

Corporate capitalisms’ favorite trick: create a massive problem (mainstream medicine – including pharmaceuticals, then profit from pretending to address the problem). Examples abound.

September 16, 2019

For Tai Chi Students: Separate Arms

September 13, 2019

Ergonomics: Workstation 101 (The Desk)

This YouTube video is pretty good on almost all counts: there is nothing wrong with the recommended exercises, or advice to ‘just get up’. He starts at the desk; I think it makes more sense to start at the floor (feet, then knees, then hips). In general, most people will do fine with his recommendations. If you are still having trouble then see a chiropractor. (I would say that wouldn’t I?)

September 12, 2019

More Active, More Better (Carrots and Sticks)

According to this new research you are five times more likely to die an early death if you are not active (the stick).

This is not new news, it is more news – same theme. ‘Eat less, move more’ has been around a while. ‘Sitting is the new smoking’ has been around a while. It is a fact that every Blue Zone population on the planet (the folks who figured out health and longevity, not to mention happiness), has known for a while.

What you do seems to matter less and less; the authorities are simply trying to get people to move more. Some people suggest that there is nothing they can think of that they would want to do, activity-wise. That is hard to believe.

As a fitness fanatic for over forty years, one of my favorite parts of helping patients get active is coming up with clever choices that fit within their range of physical capacities, and are something that they can and would like to do (they are willing to do). They may still sabotage the plan, but I am not a psychologist.

The beauty of physical activity is that if a person does get active, happy chemicals will take over (the carrot) and they will eventually develop the habit. That is the best kept secret of the healthy, happy, heavy breathers: happy chemicals. Don’t tell anyone!

September 6, 2019

“I am no longer in pain…” FOUR ISSUES

The question was “Does it ‘make sense’ to continue” with ongoing chiropractic care?

That question is in the mind of many patients, once they feel better; we sometimes get to have mature conversations about it. I had that conversation with a patient today.

First it is understood that patients almost always present with pain (or some symptom) as their “problem”. We try to distinguish between symptom as cause: as chiropractors we address their function – look for and correct a condition (the subluxation complex) causing their pain. This is part of us doing our job to (1) inform them so that they can make informed choices, and (2) help them understand chiropractic (it is not a “medical” practice), it is different!

Second, whether or not it “makes sense” is not my call. Once a patient is educated, they need to decide on their priorities. As the professional health care provider I have to give them information that helps them with that, but my recommendations is as far as that goes. We providers have to be Ok with whatever decision the patient makes, I think, and to honor that, “love them the same” is what I always say. Not everyone agrees, but that approach has many benefits for the patient, short and long term.

Third, an understanding of what it means to “continue”  with ongoing chiropractic care needs to be clarified. They what to know because of money, or time/inconvenience usually. Since my care is based on how they function, the frequency of visits is adjusted as they improve: they come in less and less often. A visit once each month or every three months rests a lot easier in the mind of the average patient trying to manage their issues (priorities). This provides another opportunity to explain that for them to do the recommended home exercise is to hold their adjustments longer, hence they can comfortably go longer between visits. It is not just logical, with experimentation patients figure that out for themselves.

Fourth, finally, this conversation often times takes place over many years of recurring episodes of pain, and in many different ways. It really can take a while for patients to believe that the doctor has their best interest in mind when making recommendations: it is perhaps rare in their experience. The beauty of being around a while (35 years now) is that the choice people make on their path have consequences that are all quite predictable. It is predictable that pain will improve rather quickly with chiropractic care (step one). Taking care of the spine will help keep the pain and progressive degenerative decay at bay (step two). The cause of health and the cause of ill health are the choices in front of each of us. The numbers of options do change over time, but as some wise and famous person once said, “It is never too late to start heading in the right direction”.

September 2, 2019

Libby Lake, 2019 (Labor Day)

August 29, 2019

Food Confusion and Science

Here is an article, solid in science, that adds context to the confusion of foods facts and dietary choices.

And like most reasonable folks these days, they can not talk about all of that without mentioning the Blue Zones.

But I guess you have heard me harp on that enough – dozens of Blog Posts are dedicated to that lifestyle.

August 28, 2019

Critical News for all Parents!

Well, important information. Whether it is news or not is another thing. It is critical though!

August 24, 2019

When To Stop Using Ice

This is a general guidelines: the context is chiropractic patients and, therefore, typically neck pain, back pain, headaches; shoulder, hip, knee, or arm pain.

For most patients in pain due to inflammation from injury, we recommend ice. Our recommendations are to put it on for 5 minutes, then take it off for 30 minutes, then repeat that process many times. If appropriate the ice can be moved around the body to different locations where there is pain and inflammation: 5 minutes on; 30 minutes off; repeat.

So patients usually do that (most of them). It works very well to reduce pain – usually much better than they expect (because while they have used ice before, not in this way).

Once the pain is no longer an issue most patients stop using ice.

That is not the time to stop using ice.

I tell patients that the time to stop using ice is when it is not tender to the touch – the context is usually me palpating the area during their visit, in the process of them being adjusted. If they are no longer bothered by the pain, and it no longer hurts when I poke on it, then they can stop using ice packs. Stop before that and the inflammation is still there. Healing has not happened. The odds of re-injury are much higher.

While we are on the subject of ice, it is important to recognize a good ice pack and use a good one. A good ice pack is soft when it comes out of the freezer! Beyond that it is a matter of getting what you pay for probably; better quality ice packs will cost more.

BTW, I do not recommend patients put ice packs on their heads.

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