Everett Chiropractic Center Blog

July 29, 2017

The Importance of Breath

“For many people it seems difficult to believe that changing breathing patterns can have such significant impact on mental and physical health. Not to mention performance and recovery.
It is the lowest hangning fruit and very few poeple are picking it. Instead many are looking for complicated methods or become dependent of pharmaceuticals.”

– Paul Silfverstrale, Wudang Practical Tai Chi Chuan

Here is his recent Blog Post entitled Nasal Breathing: https://wudangtaichichuan.wordpress.com/2017/07/29/tai-chi-chuan-qi-nasal-breathing/

It compliments, perfectly, all that I have said on this Blog on the subject, including the very recent Post on mouth breathing (the problem).

July 24, 2017

The Fat Wars, by Dr. George Lundberg

This Post is something that I got from Medscape. I can’t just paste it here because you have to be registered on their site to get it. And, I am probably violating some promise to secrecy – or some internet copyright arrangement – so don’t tell anyone that you got it here.

That said, this is a useful example of forces behind “official” recommendations: it can be a mix of facts, fiction, and fantasy. But, because if comes from what is supposed to be a credible source, we tent to give it a lot of weight. (It falls under the “be careful who you listen to” category, as far as I am concerned.

It is also an example of how things can become very complicated, but they can also be simplified (at least I will offer what I consider a simple solution).

Here is the quote from Dr. Lundberg:

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

COMMENTARY

The Fat Wars

 

“Hello and welcome. I am Dr George Lundberg and this is At Large at Medscape. I am about to fix my dinner and I do not know what to eat. Can you help me?

You probably saw the official American Heart Association’s (AHA) “Presidential Advisory” on dietary fats and cardiovascular disease, by 12 distinguished authors.[1] It was published in the AHA’s own journal, Circulation, on June 15, 2017, with much public relations hoopla. The authors ignored the world literature and cherry-picked four studies they considered the best, and pronounced that lowering the intake of saturated fat, coupled with a higher intake of polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fat, would reduce cardiovascular disease by about 30%.

Never mind that on March 18, 2014, a systematic review and meta-analysis[2] of many observational studies and clinical trials by six authors from Cambridge, England, published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, found no evidence that low consumption of total saturated fats and high consumption of polyunsaturated fats affected relative risks for coronary artery disease. Never mind that on Aug 12, 2015, 11 authors from Hamilton and Toronto, Ontario, Canada, reported, in a systematic review and meta-analysis of many prospective cohort studies,[3] that intake of saturated fats was not associated with all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease, ischemic stroke, or type 2 diabetes, although trans fats, especially of industrial origin, were.

Once upon a time, in 1982, JAMA published an early paper by the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial Research Group from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.[4] Back then, I was so naive that I believed that high serum cholesterol caused atherosclerosis.

David Cundiff is studying 19 different relative risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in 168 countries. They include consumption of animal products; refined carbohydrates; alcohol; tobacco; vitamin K2 intake; exercise level; body mass index; fasting blood sugar/hemoglobin A1c; blood pressure; medication for hypertension; cholesterol/HDL ratio; personal income; education level; gender; age; ethnicity; vitamin D level; air pollution; and fetal, infant, and childhood stress. That sounds pretty complicated. Results are published in Cureus.[5]

Finally, we have the great anecdotal case report of Fred Kummerow, who died on May 31, 2017.[6] Illinois professor Kummerow was born in Germany, moved to Wisconsin between the wars, and became a PhD biochemist. He never did believe much about cholesterol, saturated fats, eggs, meat, and butter having anything to do with heart disease. But from 1957 on, his research demonstrated big-time vascular damage from trans fats, margarine, and fried foods.[7,8] Four hundred Kummerow research papers later, the US Food and Drug Administration finally moved against the practice of adding manufactured trans fats to processed food.

Did I mention that he was 102 years old when he died this year? He practiced what he preached.

Meanwhile, back to the 19 risk factors. I am in good shape on 13 of them; there is nothing I can do about four; so I guess I will fix myself some beans and carrots, an apple, and one hard-boiled egg.

That is my opinion. I am Dr George Lundberg, at large at Medscape.”

So how do you simplify? Easy. The healthiest, longest lived, and happiest people on earth do things a certain way; do it that way. See Blue Zones Posts on this Blog for more information.

June 11, 2017

Priority #1 Video (Breathing!)

It is amazing where and from whom you learn the most important stuff: in this case it was while having my teeth cleaned.

What I like about this video is that, first, tai chi is never mentioned one time. And second, all of this wisdom and life-changing advice flows naturally in the learning and practice of… tai chi!

The last thing about this video that makes it priceless is that you are not hearing any of it from me. If you have heard it all from me in the past, perhaps this video will impress upon you the value of the information. If not, please take every word seriously – she makes one technical, little tiny, mistake, but the message is huge and everyone needs to hear it. You especially need to hear it if you plan to deliver via C-section, plan not to breast feed, or plan to feed your baby cow products… or if any of the above happened to you. (I know, you are wondering how and if all of those things are really related. They are.) Enjoy this amazingly important presentation.

May 8, 2017

Mindfulness and Fecal Transplants

I choose to share the link relating to mindfulness. It is about how Freshman stress less and smile more. You might like it!

DrD

March 31, 2017

How Slow Breathing Induces Tranquility

Filed under: Exercise, General Health & Wellness, Meditation, Tai Chi Chuan, Wellness care — Tags: , , — doctordilday @ 12:02 pm

This is from Neuroscience News…

Breathing is basic. Better breathing is healthy. Access to breath control through training is access to relaxation. (We could go on all day about that by itself, and on this Blog I have – if you search the terms you will find many Posts). And relaxation is key to stress management on many many levels. (Right now I am reading The Unthinkable, where the importance of breath control is highlighted as the primary means of controlling fear in an emergency situation.)

March 26, 2017

Dr. Weil on Tai Chi: File Under: Not News But Nice To Know That He Is On Board

https://www.drweil.com/blog/health-tips/stress-management-tai-chi-for-balance/

 

For Tai Chi Students: Inspiration

http://taichivideos.org/90-year-old-performs-tai-chi-chuan/

 

 

February 10, 2017

For Tai Chi Students: Sword Form Comparisons

Worth a look – lots of room for conversation.

http://jianfa.se/form_comparison/formlist_qian_kun_jian.html

 

January 24, 2017

She couldn’t wait to tell me…

The first patient in the office this morning said that she was amazed at what happened when she practiced the breathing exercise I gave her on her last visit.

Patients show up, usually, with some ache or pain. Once that is dealt with there are often underlying or other issues that come up; stress-related tension is common.

For that and many other reasons we often teach people how to breath, if they are interested. How to breath, so you can relax, so you will be less tense, so you can hold your chiropractic adjustments, so you will feel better: it all goes together.

Anyway, I gave her the most basic of breathing instructions; the same one I give every patient, every tai chi student, and anyone else that cares to listen (It is probably on the Blog somewhere in fact.). She tried it, and…

Almost immediately fell asleep.

(She was pleasantly stunned and amazed.)

 

January 17, 2017

For Tai Chi Students: A Great Review of Tai Chi by Dan Docherty

May 16, 2016

Lincoln Plaza, Bellevue WA

DSCF0236 DSCF0238

 

 

 

 

 

This is where I did Tai chi at 7 a.m. on Saturday. Beautiful huh? (You can’t tell but it was even better than it looks: the sound of flowing water was everywhere…)

I was attending a seminar across the street at the Bellevue Club starting at 8 a.m. and I knew that I would be mostly sitting until 5 p.m., so I got there early and did both the left and right Long Round Hand Form. On person came and went while I was there. There were no other interruptions.

With Tai chi you can wear whatever you are wearing  – within reason. I wear clothes that work for the occasion, and work for doing Tai chi. With Tai chi you really only need a reasonably flat spot and a little space: parking lots, airport terminals, tennis courts, parks, banquet rooms, have all served me well in a pinch.

Tai chi takes away a lot of excuses while delivering ‘the perfect exercise’.

May 2, 2016

A Great Success, And A Lot Of Fun

Our World Tai Chi & Qigong Day event on Saturday went well. There was a good turn out of regulars and strangers (thanks Everett Herald!), the weather was perfect, and everyone had a good time. Afterward we had a potluck lunch and watched Tai Chi videos of my teacher and his teacher… so everyone also learned!

Here are a few of my more persistent students…

IMG_4817

Older Posts »

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: