Everett Chiropractic Center Blog

October 13, 2017

A Little (Exercise) Goes A Long Way (Depression prevention)

As little as an hour of not-too-hard exercise weekly…

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October 3, 2017

Just One Hour… of Exercise: Depression

Research on time well spent.

February 2, 2017

More On The Mediterranean Diet, This Time As It Relates to Mood

What’s not to like. Here is a Blog Post by one of my favorite Greek writers on a Study that shows just one more reason to eat like the Greeks. I recommend her Blog whole-heartedly if you want to learn how to cook like the Greeks (for the purposes of health – Note: she adheres precisely to the recommendations of the BlueZone folks; I don’t think that that is an accident).

http://www.olivetomato.com/mediterranean-diet-may-be-able-to-improve-your-mood-here-is-what-you-need-to-eat/

DrD

September 12, 2016

101 Benefits of Exercise.94

Research overwhelmingly shows that regular exercise lowers the risk for many diseases, enhances the functioning of virtually every physiological system in the human body and improves psychological well-being.

94. Improves your mood. (That is an understatement; it’s all about the happy chemicals – our big secret:-)

I will be Posting a benefit every day – well, most days – from a list put together by Dr. Dave Phillips, M.D. He is an M.D. from Atlanta, GA who specializes in Sports Medicine. As a former All-American swimmer he knows a few things about exercise. He is also on the JuicePlus+ Health Advisory Board. He is also all over YouTube doing videos on JuicePlus+, exercise, and other health-related topics.

You can be healthier: this is list of ways exercise affects the body; think of them as motivational if you like.

May 25, 2016

101 Benefits of Exercise.51

 

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Research overwhelmingly shows that regular exercise lowers the risk for many diseases, enhances the functioning of virtually every physiological system in the human body and improves psychological well-being.

51. Helps to alleviate depression. (Posts you get when you search ‘depression’ on this Blog.)

I will be Posting a benefit every day – well, most days – from a list put together by Dr. Dave Phillips, M.D. He is an M.D. from Atlanta, GA who specializes in Sports Medicine. As a former All-American swimmer he knows a few things about exercise. He is also on the JuicePlus+ Health Advisory Board. He is also all over YouTube doing videos on JuicePlus+, exercise, and other health-related topics.

This list of benefits of exercise will help you to remember why working out is a priority IF you want to be healthy (if you don’t want to be healthy then you are reading the wrong Blog!)

August 26, 2014

American Flag Humor

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , , , — doctordilday @ 2:28 pm
 

(function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = “//connect.facebook.net/en_US/all.js#xfbml=1”; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, ‘script’, ‘facebook-jssdk’));

Worth sharing I think…

 

Wow, that “embed” didn’t work too well, but if you click on “Post” you’ll get there:-)

August 1, 2014

Cashews and Depression

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Here is the article…

Kinda makes you think, huh?

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For more information click here.

February 1, 2013

Another reason not to drink Pop, or…

…another reason to drink Kangen Water🙂

I was standing at the counter in a Restaurant yesterday, and there was a Medical doctor on the TV talking about brain damage (the sound wasn’t on but that was what I got from all the graphics, and it was dubbed – if that means there was writing at the bottom as they spoke.)

Anyway, he said that people who drink Pop have a 30% increased chance of being clinically depressed. He spent a lot of time talking about how high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) causes you to never really get the feeling of being full, which I have posted about before. You can see why the dairy people, the meat people, the wheat people and the potato people love it when you super-size that combo meal. (Below is a video by someone else on the dangers of HFCS.)

So with Pop, first the Pop people get rich off the declining health of our Nation; then the medics get rich selling drugs to “fight” the diseases that Pop and the Pop lifestyle causes.

With Kangen Water – and the lifestyle that usually goes with that – you cause Health.

November 14, 2011

Tai Chi for Depression – The Mind Body Connection

Filed under: Breath work, Meditation, Tai Chi Chuan, Wellness care — Tags: , , , , — doctordilday @ 3:43 pm

From the World Tai Chi & Qigong Site…

The deep breathing and mental focus that are a part of many workouts may also improve depressive symptoms. Mind-body workouts, such as yoga and tai chi may provide a better boost because they include a introspective and “mindful” element that traditional gym workouts may not have. Since some people fear the side effects of many antidepressant medications, offering alternative treatments, such as exercise-specifically a mind-body exercise like yoga-makes sense. Several research reviews have looked at the effects.

Read entire article at: http://health.msn.com/health-topics/depression/mind-body-moves-for-depression

It just occurred to me yesterday as I was finishing up my Forms practice at the local City Park that it would be hard to be in a bad mood after doing Tai Chi because your brain is floating in all those happy chemicals. It also occurred to me that the same might be said of sitting mediation, but in Tai Chi practice you also have all that sweating (if it isn’t too cold out), the stretching, etc. More going on translates into a greater overall effect I think.

May 24, 2010

Depressed? Try Tai Chi

May 27, 2010 — Tai Chi appears to be associated with improvements in psychological well-being, although well-controlled, longer randomized trials are needed, according to the results of a systematic review and meta-analysis reported in the May 21 issue of BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine.

“Tai Chi, the Chinese low impact mind-body exercise, has been practiced for centuries for health and fitness in the East and is currently gaining popularity in the West,” said lead author Chenchen Wang, from Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston, Massachusetts, in a news release. “It is believed to improve mood and enhance overall psychological well being, but convincing evidence has so far been lacking.”

The reviewers searched 8 English-language and 3 Chinese-language databases through March 2009 for randomized controlled trials, nonrandomized controlled studies, and observational studies reporting at least 1 psychological health outcome. Two reviewers extracted and verified data, and a random-effects model allowed meta-analysis of randomized trials in each subcategory of health outcomes.

Methodologic quality of each study was also evaluated.

The reviewers identified 40 studies enrolling a total of 3817 participants and reporting on a total of 29 psychological measurements. Of 33 randomized and nonrandomized trials, 21 reported significant improvements in psychological well-being with 1 hour to 1 year of regular Tai Chi.

Specific effects in community-dwelling healthy participants and in patients with chronic conditions were decreased stress (effect size [ES], 0.66; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.23 – 1.09), anxiety (ES, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.29 – 1.03), and depression (ES, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.31 – 0.80), and improved mood (ES, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.20 – 0.69).

“More detailed knowledge about the physiological and psychological effects of Tai Chi exercise may lead to new approaches to promote health, treat chronic medical conditions, better inform clinical decisions and further explicate the mechanisms of successful mind-body medicine,” Dr. Wang said.

The beneficial association between Tai Chi practice and psychological health was supported by 7 observational studies with relatively large sample sizes.

“Tai Chi appears to be associated with improvements in psychological well-being including reduced stress, anxiety, depression and mood disturbance, and increased self-esteem. Definitive conclusions were limited due to variation in designs, comparisons, heterogeneous outcomes and inadequate controls. High-quality, well-controlled, longer randomized trials are needed to better inform clinical decisions.”

The study authors have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2010;10:23.

Below is the full abstract with the Title, Authors and journal citation:

BMC Complement Altern Med. 2010 May 21;10(1):23. [Epub ahead of print]
Tai Chi on psychological well-being: systematic review and meta-analysis.
Wang C, Bannuru R, Ramel J, Kupelnick B, Scott T, Schmid CH.

Abstract

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Physical activity and exercise appear to improve psychological health. However, the quantitative effects of Tai Chi on psychological well-being have rarely been examined. We systematically reviewed the effects of Tai Chi on stress, anxiety, depression and mood disturbance in eastern and western populations.

METHODS: Eight English and 3 Chinese databases were searched through March 2009. Randomized controlled trials, non-randomized controlled studies and observational studies reporting at least 1 psychological health outcome were examined. Data were extracted and verified by 3 reviewers. The randomized trials in each subcategory of health outcomes were meta-analyzed using a random-effects model. The quality of each study was assessed. RESULTS: Forty studies totaling 3817 subjects were identified.

Approximately 29 psychological measurements were assessed. Twenty-three of 33 randomized and nonrandomized trials reported that 1 hour to 1 year of regular Tai Chi significantly increased psychological well-being including reduction of stress (effect size [ES], 0.66; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.23 to 1.09), anxiety (ES, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.29 to 1.03), and depression (ES, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.31 to 0.80), and enhanced mood and emotion (ES, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.20 to 0.69) in community-dwelling healthy participants and in patients with chronic conditions. Seven observational studies with relatively large sample sizes reinforced the beneficial association between Tai Chi practice and psychological health.

CONCLUSIONS: Tai Chi appears to be associated with improvements in psychological well-being including reduced stress, anxiety, depression and mood disturbance, and increased self-esteem. Definitive conclusions were limited due to variation in designs, comparisons, heterogeneous outcomes and inadequate controls. High-quality, well-controlled, longer randomized trials are needed to better inform clinical decisions.

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