Everett Chiropractic Center Blog

February 8, 2019

The OliveTomato

Here is the link to the latest Post by my favorite source for Mediterranean anything, but diet and lifestyle in particular. She does a great job of balanced coverage of the issues that come up in the research and the press around all things Greek and as it relates to the Mediterranean Diet.

A lot of people have a lot to say about a lot of things: Most don’t know as much as they would lead you to believe. She does.

You have to be careful who you listen to…

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February 4, 2019

The Sky is Blue (usually), Rain is Wet, and…

Exercise is Your Best Defense Against Deep Abdominal Fat

Well, actually, it won’t be enough, long term, by itself… search “Jason Fung, MD” on this Blog for Posts on a message that we all need to hear.

January 28, 2019

Seth Godin (Again) – Opportunity Costs

He is a genius.

Opportunity costs just went up

Every choice has a price.

If you have $100 to invest and you buy this stock instead of that bond, the interest you gave up in making your choice is your opportunity cost.

At the dinner buffet, you can take as much food as you like, but you can only consume so much food. Which means that eating the jambalaya means you won’t have room to eat a dosa. That’s your opportunity cost.

Opportunity cost is the key to making decisions. Once you know the value of the alternatives you’re giving up, you can be smarter about what you’re choosing to do.

Time is finite. We only get the next hour once, and then it’s gone forever. So choices about how we spend or invest our time come with real opportunity costs.

A car with a bumper sticker that says, “I’d rather be surfing,” tells us a lot about the driver (including the inconsistency of his or her actions). But it’s proof that each of us wrestles with opportunity costs every day.

With that in mind, the cost of watching a cat video on YouTube is real indeed.

And the internet has raised the opportunity cost of time spent.

Our access to the world of learning and online resources means that the alternatives are far more valuable than they used to be.

You’re about to spend 11 minutes perfecting an email to a customer. You could do a 90% ideal job in one minute, and the extra 10 minutes spent will increase the ‘quality’ of the email to 92%.

The alternative? Now, you could spend that ten minutes reading a chapter of an important new book. You could learn a few new functions in Javascript. You could dive deep into the underlying economics of your new project…

Or perhaps you’re about to spend an hour manually cleaning a database or tweaking some image files. You do this every day.

Today, though, you could invest an hour in learning to build a macro that will do this recurring job in just a minute a day from now on. Or you could figure out how to hire a trusted freelancer who will do the job on a regular basis for far less than it’s costing you to do it yourself.

Next week, the choices you made at the buffet won’t matter much. But if you learn a new skill, you own it forever.

Human beings don’t like thinking about opportunity costs. As they approach infinity, it’s easy to get paralyzed. As they get harder to compute, it’s difficult to focus and be mindful of the choices already made. That’s a challenge.

But worse, far worse, is to ignore them and fail to learn and connect and level up.

January 27, 2019

Truth: On Many Levels (Seth Godin)

Relentlessly lowering expectations

We always compare performance on a relative basis. “Well, it’s better than it was yesterday…”

Toddlers, for example, seem like geniuses compared to the babies they used to be.

Some people around us have embraced a strategy of always lowering expectations so that their mediocre effort is seen as acceptable. Over time, we embrace the pretty good memo or the decent leadership moment, because it’s so much better than we feared.

And some? Some relentlessly raise expectations, establishing a standard that it’s hard to imagine exceeding. And then they do.

If you’ve been cornered into following, working with or serving someone in the first group, an intervention can be rewarding. For you and for the person trapped in this downward cycle.

Raising our expectations is a fine way to raise performance as well.

January 11, 2019

Meaningful Life Tied to Healthy Aging

Summary: According to researchers, older adults who engage in activities perceived to be worthwhile, such as supporting grandchildren or completing a project, have better sleep, walking speeds and experience less chronic pain.

Source: UCL.

January 2, 2019

The Immune System’s Fountain of Youth

These folks are really talking about FASTING… see all the Posts re: “Jason Fung, M.D.” for detailed discussion of why you might care. Use the search box to the right…

October 7, 2018

Fasting and the 2016 Nobel Prize in Medicine

A student of fasting for over 40 years, I began Blogging about it some eight plus years ago, in a post on Juice Fasting. In fact things have gotten to the point where we have to put “fasting” in quotes, to clarify what we mean because it is becoming as meaningless a word as “natural”.

Here there are a number of Posts on the subject.

This Blue Zones Blog Post reviewing the work of Japanese cell biologist Yoshinori Ohsumi, who did win the 2016 Nobel Prize for Medicine as a result of his work on autophagy (a process that happens when you abstain from food – or by the way – to some extent when you exercise), is the most important Post on this entire Blog!

My wife thinks that this Wedge of Awareness Post is my best, but here, in this Blue Zones Post is a gold mine of amazing information that can and would change your life for the better – no matter how bad off or how well off you are right now.

It is not something that you do; it’s something you don’t do!

It is free. It takes less time than whatever it is you are doing now. It is simple. And, with just the simplest and easiest of rules to follow, you can not screw it up. You can do it in progressions: start where you are, and gradually lengthen the time between “supper” and “breakfast”. Simple. Drink water (you know the water that I recommend, but get the best water you can find and afford).

(This needs a disclaimer: do this only under the supervision of a doctor – you may be too sick for the cure – it may not be for you. Perhaps there is some valid reason why you can not stretch out the time between supper and breakfast (you might be in the 1% – a guess – for whom this is not appropriate). If it turns out to be a rough ride from where you are to get back to health, you may want a partner to help guide you. Include your doctor in the process, it will education them as much as it does you!)

I could get more emphatic, but…

… it would not do any good.

Now it is up to you.

October 4, 2018

The Spice of Life (Healthy Spices, that is!)

https://www.worldhealth.net/news/spices-may-help-digestion/

September 14, 2018

Dietary Fiber Reduces Brain Inflammation During Aging

File under: every little bit helps…

Summary: Researchers report a high fiber diet can help to reduce both intestinal and brain inflammation during aging.

Source: University of Illinois.

July 2, 2018

“prevalence induced concept change”

Not as hard to grasp as it sounds. And interesting… the research, that is.

June 25, 2018

Music Lessons Improve Language Skills

If you need more reasons to have your child learn to play music, here it is…

June 23, 2018

More on the Mediterranean Diet (with great references!)

https://www.olivetomato.com/benefits-mediterranean-diet-is-the-best-diet/

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