Everett Chiropractic Center Blog

May 31, 2019

Jason Fung, M.D. : Newly Published Research

I put this under ‘Jason Fung, M.D.’ on the Blog because it is new, and because it is research on Diabetes. But it has nothing to do with him: unless you have read his books and recognize a pattern.

This is ‘research’ in which we are supposed to read the headline, but never actually digest the small print – and it is written in such a way that it is not easy to digest even if you can. Read the last sentence of this Post. Dig into the article only if you think that you can appreciate what is, and what is not, being said. Then disregard all of it and go back and re-read Jason Fungs’ books.

Taken from Medscape

New Diabetes Cases in US Fall by 35% After 20-Year Rise

Miriam E. Tucker

May 30, 2019

“Rates of diagnosed diabetes in the United States may finally be declining but overall numbers remain high, new findings suggest.

The analysis of data for an almost 40-year period (1980-2017) from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) was published online May 28 in BMJ Open Diabetes Research and Care by Stephen R. Benoit, MD, and colleagues from the Division of Diabetes Translation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, Georgia.

After nearly a two-decade increase in both prevalence and incidence of diagnosed diabetes in the United States, the prevalence — the number of people living with diagnosed diabetes — has stabilized for the past 8 years and there has been a decrease in incidence, driven mostly by that seen among non-Hispanic whites.

This reduction means new cases declined by 35% from 2008 to 2017, a sign, perhaps, that efforts to stop the nation’s diabetes epidemic are working, say the researchers.

However, they caution, “Causes of the plateauing of prevalence and decrease in incidence are unclear and although the trends are encouraging, the overall burden of diabetes remains high and warrants continued intervention and monitoring.””

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May 28, 2019

Jason Fung, M.D.: Complete Guide to FASTING (2016)

From Chapter 2, A Brief History of Fasting, Modern Fasting

(probably page 68 but I am not sure)

“Fasting began to appear in the medical literature in the early 1900s. In 1915, an article in the Journal of Biological Chemistry described fasting as “a perfectly safe, harmless, and effective method for reducing the weight of those suffering from obesity.” However, in a time rife with poverty, infectious diseases, and war, obesity was hardly the problem it is today. Severe food shortages were present during the two world wars and the intervening Great Depression. Treatments for obesity were not a priority.

I the late 1950s, Dr. W. L. Bloom reignited interest in short-term fasting as a therapeutic measure, but longer periods were also well described in the literature. In a study published in 1968, Dr. I. C. Gilliland reported his experience with forty-six patients “whose reducing regime started with a standard absolute fast for 14 days.”

After the late 1960s, interest in therapeutic fasting seemed to again fade, mostly because obesity was still not a major public health issue. Coronary heart disease was the major health concern of the time, and nutritional research focused on dietary fat and cholesterol. Commercial interests also became pervasive, and as you might guess, large food corporations will not support any intervention that threatens their existence. So fasting as an adjunct to diet started to fade. Despite the fact that fasting is low-fat, as well as low-everything-else, it had almost entirely disappeared by the 1980s.”

[It might be good to read that again.]

April 17, 2019

“The Complete Guide to FASTING” by Jason Fung, MD

This from the section on Early Adopters, he also includes quotes by Benjamin Franklin and Mark Twain, after a longer section on the value of fasting among the early Greeks.

“One early fasting advocate was Hippocrates of Cos (c.460-c.370 BC), widely considered the father of modern medicine. In his lifetime, people came to the realization that obesity was an evolving and serious disease. Hippocrates wrote, ‘Sudden death is more common in those who are naturally fat than in the lean.’ He advised that treatment for obesity should include exertion after meals and eating a high-fat diet, and he recommended that ‘they should, moreover, eat only once in a day.’ In other words, incorporating a daily twenty-four hour fast was even then recognized as highly beneficial in the treatment of obesity. Proving once again that Hippocrates is worthy of our reverence, he also recognized the benefits of physical exercise and eating plenty of health fats in a health lifestyle.”

“Other intellectual giants throughout history were also great proponents of fasting. Paracelsus (1493-1541) a Swiss German physician and the founder of toxicology, famously wrote, ‘The dose makes the poison.'” A brilliant and transformative scientist, he also wrote, ‘Fasting is the greatest remedy – the physician within.”

 

April 2, 2019

“The Complete Guide to FASTING” by Jason Fung, MD – More on Spiritual Fasting

page 65

“In the Christian tradition, fasting and prayer are often methods of cleansing and renewing the soul. Symbolically, believers empty their souls so that they may be ready to receive God. Fasting is not so much about self-denial but about a reaching for spirituality and being able to commune with God and hear his voice. By fasting, you put your body under submission to the Holy Spirit, humble your sold before the presence of God, and prepare yourself to hear the voice of God.

Greek Orthodox Christians may follow various fasts on 180 to 200 days of the year. Famous nutrition teacher Ancel Keys often considered Creete the poster child for the healthy Mediterranean diet. However, there was a critically important factor of their diet that he completely dismissed: most of the population of Crete followed the Greek Orthodox tradition of fasting. The may have contributed to the healthy longevity of this population.
[My emphasis!]

Buddhist monks are know to abstain from eating after noon, fasting until the next morning. In addition, there may be water-only fasts for days or weeks on end. They fast to quench their human desires, which helps them rise above all desires order to achieve nirvana and and all suffering. This fits with their core beliefs in moderation and austerity.”

Actually, there is even more…

I don’t think it helps if you do not get the How-to-do and the What-to-do part. Below is a Brochure out of the Greek Orthodox church in Bellingham (St. Sophia Greek Orthodox Church has the annual festival with music, food, etc., and a tour of their church). It asks and answers the question: “Why do you fast so much?”

Here is their answer – I think that it is useful to know, not so we can copy it exactly, but so we can understand that principles at work, and get a general idea of what they do and how (the why is a big argument people can have face to face, not here):

“To clarify, fasting doesn’t mean giving up all food and water. Orthodox fasting practice, when followed strictly, means that not partaking of any animal products (e.i., meat, dairy, eggs, etc.), nor of olive oil or wine.

Fasting one of many tools that we use to bring our bodies “under subjugation” as St. Paul said (1 Cor. 9:27), so that we might be pure and holy. Jesus said that when He had gone, His followers would fast. Like the early Christians, we fast so that we may learn to control our appetite for all things that are not good and holy. It is not about earning salvation, it is a tool to help us work out our salvation with fear and trembling (Phill. 2:12), enabling us to train and strengthen our wills so that they can be turned toward Christ.

Specifically, we fast each Wednesday to commemorate the day when Jesus was betrayed and each Friday to commemorate His death on the cross. In addition, we fast during the entire Lenten period and the entire Advent period, as well as during other times of the year.”

March 31, 2019

“The Complete Guide to FASTING” by Jason Fung, MD – Introduction

page 64

Spiritual Fasting

“Fasting is widely practiced for spiritual reasons…”.

“In spiritual terms, it is often called cleansing or purification, but practically, it amounts to the same thing.”

“The practice of fasting developed…, …not as something that was harmful but as something that was deeply, intrinsically beneficial to the human body and spirit. Fasting is not so much a treatment for illness but a treatment for wellness. The regular application of fasting helps protect people from illness and keeps them feeling well.”

“In the story of Adam and Eve, the only act that is prohibited in the Garden of Eden is to eat the fruit of one tree, and Eve is tempted by the serpent to betray this trust. Fasting is thus act of turning away from temptation and back toward God.”

“In the Bible, Matthew 4:2 states, ‘Then Jesus was led by the Spirit into the wilderness to be tempted by the devil. After fasting forty days and forty nights, he was hungry.’ (I’ll mention here the interesting point that hunger often disappears during extended fast, which has been noted throughout history.)”

February 27, 2019

Interval Training May Be Best for Weight Loss

Aside from the fact that exercise alone will never provide the long-term results in weight loss that most people would like (for that you would search this Blog for Jason Fung, MD) , this research is still useful.

February 7, 2019

Healthy Diet May Help Ease Depression Symptoms

Summary: A new study adds to growing evidence that altering diet and lifestyle could help to improve symptoms of depression. The study reports, making simple dietary changes, such as eating more nutrient dense meals and cutting back on refined sugars, can help to reduce symptoms associated with anxiety and depression.

See “Jason Fung, MD” on this Blog for more information.

January 25, 2019

Intermittent Fasting Plus Lower-Calorie Diet May Be Best

Can you say, “Mediterranean Diet” or “Jason Fung, M.D.”?

This new study’s findings are consistent with both.

“Overweight women who ate a lower-calorie diet and fasted 3 days a week lost more weight and had better cardiometabolic markers than women who only reduced their calorie intake, or only fasted, or did neither in a small, 8-week randomized trial.

“Obese women who followed a diet in which they ate 70% of their required energy intake and fasted intermittently lost the most weight,” said lead author Amy T. Hutchison, post-doctoral researcher, Adelaide Medical School, University of Adelaide, Australia, in a statement from her university.”

January 16, 2019

How Fasting Can Improve Overall Health (think Jason Fung, M.D.)

Summary: Researchers report fasting affects the circadian rhythm of the liver and skeletal muscles, allowing them to rewire their metabolism. The study suggests fasting can help improve health and protect against aging related diseases.

Source: UC Irvine.

January 15, 2019

Sugar’s Sick Secrets: How Industry Forces Have Manipulated Science to Downplay the Harm(The Problem)

More on that here…if you ever thought that the food industry was your friend, re-think that.

The Solution

Search this Blog for ‘Jason Fung, M.D.’ and read or view everything he says: it boils down to just three or four simple messages, but getting the message may save your life.

If you are healthy, his message will help to keep you that way.

If you are NOT healthy, his message is the most important thing you can learn and understand. A starting place for regaining health. A strategy for taking back control. A way out when all other efforts may have failed. A simple approach that anyone can do: it costs nothing – in fact it will SAVE you money, time, energy, and effort.

December 27, 2018

Jason Fung, M.D. : Two Big Lies About Type II Diabetes

December 22, 2018

The Mediterranean Diet Again – This Time Re: Depression

Junk Food Diet Raises Depression Risk

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