Everett Chiropractic Center Blog

March 16, 2020

For Tai Chi Students: Online Training

More stuff from my teacher, from the past…

May 30, 2019

“Beyond Measure” – A Book Review

Beyond Measure (2015), by Vicki Abeles and Grace Rubinstein, is about rescuing an “over scheduled, over tested, underestimated generation”. It followed a documentary, also done by the author, called “Race to Nowhere.”

The issues of the current generation trying to become adults spills over into the conversations we have with patients – and their kids (they are all patients:-).

I had no idea the magnitude of the problem. Yes, we have – for years – talked about the heavy back packs; and now, of course we talk about “text neck”. That is the tip of the iceberg.

I would say that if you have school-aged kids, or will have, or they or their parents are in your life at all, this would be a book for you. It is well written, and though the authors spend a lot of print on the problem – details meant to convince and compel, which I do not need, but you may.

Here I would just like to share quotes that struck me.

“nature-deficit disorder” on page 79 – it becomes a health issue very quickly.

Meaningless (school work) leaving the kids with no sense of purpose. “Change the system not just the symptoms”. (They do a great job of getting to cause.)

“deep learning is as much about the process as it is about the product.

Become a “Rat Racer in Recovery” page 197. They do this a lot – it helps with retention:-)

“An act of cultural defiance” breaking old habit and familiar patterns – in maintaining balance – referring to digital detox.

“Define success with wellness at the core.” There is an idea that I can get behind!

In reclaiming a runaway schedule: ask what matter most (to yourself, and the kids – ask them the question).

Peace has to precede wellness – first measure of successful parenting – who they are verse what they do.

Focus on real connection

School work should be done at school.

“There is more than one path to a meaningful life.”

This whole book is about “project-based learning” as an alternative to what kids experience currently.

“Frustrated beyond function”

“A problem shrouded in silence a decade ago.”

“Childhood is not a race: say ‘no, it’s not a race'”.

“The most important lessons and qualities can not be measured – insisting on measuring them will never lead kids to thrive.”

Chapter 8, First Be Well – “The deliberate promotion of children’s wellbeing”, “Beyond healthy – strive toward happy”, Prevention: social and emotional learning; positive psychology (University of Pennsylvania, Martin Seligman); and… mindfulness (See 2014 cover of TIME magazine)

The coordinator of mental health services and outreach at Harvard started offering mindfulness classes in student dorms and found it to be the “single most effective tool” he’s encountered in his work so far.” Page 198

This hits home for me, of course, as a Tai Chi instructor, both at the local Community College, and a local gym. Mindfulness, relaxation, and developing both external and internal awareness, is at the very heart of Tai Chi.

I would like to end with a quote from the front cover of the book: “America. This is your wake-up call. With both heart and smarts, Vicki Abeles showcases the courageous communities that are rejecting the childhood rat race and reclaiming health and learning. Our kids really need us to listen.” – MARIE SHRIVER

March 1, 2019

“Follow The Breath to Enter the Zone”

I put that in quotes because it comes from a book by Patrick McKeown entitled, The Oxygen Advantage. I share it because it is almost the exact verbiage I have use to teach tai chi students how to breath – in their first class. He didn’t get it from me; and I didn’t get it from him. It is fundamental to healthy breathing, as a starting spot. In tai chi it is part of getting centered and grounded before embarking of the journey that is the tai chi Hand Form. On this Blog I have also talked endlessly about the benefits of proper breathing; and the consequences of not doing so.

Here are his words…

“Following the breath involves observing the cycle of each inhalation and exhalation, and is a simple and useful method of internalizing your focus while shutting out any unnecessary thoughts. …

… The breath is the bridge between the mind and the body

July 7, 2018

Experiencing a Stressful Day May Lower Cognitive Abilities Throughout the Day

Summary: Waking up feeling stressed and anxious can impact your cognitive function throughout the day, researchers report. A new study reveals those who woke up feeling as though the day ahead would be stressful experienced problems with working memory later in the day. Researchers say the anticipation of stress impacts cognition, even if a stressful event does not occur.

Source: Penn State.

June 22, 2018

What’s this “may” business!

“Mindful Movement May Lower Stress and Anxiety”

Stress Levels Change After Meditation

Summary: Researchers report meditation and yoga are more effective at reducing stress than Chi in soldiers. Additionally, those who meditate showed stronger executive control.

Source: U.S Army Research Laboratory.

For a thousand years, people have reported feeling better by meditating but there has never been a systematic study that quantified stress and how much stress changes as a direct result of meditation until now.

U.S. Army Research Laboratory researchers spent a year collaborating with a team of scientists from the University of North Texas to develop a new data processing technique that uses heart rate variability as a sensor to monitor the state of the brain. Their findings are reported in a paper published in the June edition of Frontiers in Physiology.

[It gets technical, and you do not need to read the whole thing, but do get the point: meditation is beneficial as it relates to stress. A point that I have been harping on in Posts on this Blog for 13 years – and a integral part of why Tai Chi is perfect exercise… ¬†Incidentally, this “Chi” thing referred to in the research is, no doubt, a new agey flavor of the month, so there is another lesson to be learned: the traditional approaches produce results not immediately reproducible by copy cat attempts.]

December 24, 2017

Multiple Independent Threshold Units

neurons-physics-brain-activity-neurosciencenews-public

You probably don’t want to read the review of the Study, but…Things have changed… Again.

“Using new types of experiments on neuronal cultures, a group of scientists, led by Prof. Ido Kanter, of the Department of Physics at Bar-Ilan University, has demonstrated that this century-old assumption regarding brain activity is mistaken.”

August 17, 2016

‘Doing nothing does quite a lot’

http://campaign.r20.constantcontact.com/render?m=1116637109108&ca=f98d7fb7-f60f-49e7-970d-d854338b192e

 

January 27, 2015

Ancient Beliefs Backed By Science

How nice.

This article talks about both Tai Chi and Meditation putting them in the same scale of revelation as the earth isn’t flat. Check it out if you need more evidence. If you already know that the earth is not flat it isn’t quite so important.

January 13, 2015

If You Want To Lose Weight…

… meditate!

Weigh loss is a head game for most people (well, almost everyone). Meditating allows for all kinds of breakthroughs as you access the issues surrounding your weight. Think on it. Notice the feelings that come up. Try to feel the feelings, and not think too much (the analyzing, judging, commentary that you are used to is a habit that hasn’t served you too well perhaps). Let the feels play themselves out and new (original) thoughts will surface – thoughts derived from new awareness.

Here is a Post that relates to this. Some say it’s my best Post ever. In this case the automatic response might be to eat… and eat… and eat. The emotional satisfaction that comes from the visceral feeling of being full (as in belly is full of food) is well known to many people with weight issues. Sound familiar? Meditation will help you make conscious choices.

November 12, 2014

Cancer, Telomeres, and Meditation

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Those telomeres again

June 10, 2014

A Brain Exercise For Creativity?

Filed under: General Health & Wellness, Meditation — Tags: , , , — doctordilday @ 12:21 pm

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Here is a link to a decent article re-enforcing much of what I have often written about. Here is talks about counting, but it’s really as simple and “noticing” your breath.

And, as I have recommended in the past, I think Centerpointe with Holosync Technology is as good as it gets. It is particularly good if you have tried meditation in the past and found it difficult.

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