Everett Chiropractic Center Blog

May 9, 2019

How To Stay Motivated

One way to stay motivated is to expose yourself to good news about what you are trying to stick to or accomplish. This link regarding new research into the whys and hows of the Mediterranean Diet is not news – but it is encouraging. I do not know why they refer to Mediterranean ‘Diets’ but whatever.

Notice that they did not even mention fasting. By narrowing the conversation to just “diet” (what you eat), they miss two points now regarded as critical to the understanding of how and why the Mediterranean Lifestyle produces the healthiest, happiest, and oldest folks on planet Earth. The first is that fasting (which we now have to put in parentheses, but…) may be one of the most important aspects; the other is that it is a lifestyle. What you actually eat is important, in all kinds of ways. But it doesn’t get you there. Look at the bigger picture.

Take a look at the study and be motivated, inspired and energized for being right in the middle of the path to health.

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April 26, 2019

Polyphenols in JuicePlus+ (Research)

April 1, 2019

How Many Servings of Fruits and Vegetables Add Years to Your Life?

“Blue zones area centenarians eat a 95 percent plant-based diet rich in beans, greens, grains, and nuts. In recent years, there have been countless studies about longevity diets, and healthy diets in general, but one piece of advice seems to ring true for all: Eat more fruits and vegetables.”

More from the folks at Blue Zones on this subject.

March 20, 2019

Coffee Research: Blue Zones, Mediterranean Diet

More here…

February 8, 2019

The OliveTomato

Here is the link to the latest Post by my favorite source for Mediterranean anything, but diet and lifestyle in particular. She does a great job of balanced coverage of the issues that come up in the research and the press around all things Greek and as it relates to the Mediterranean Diet.

A lot of people have a lot to say about a lot of things: Most don’t know as much as they would lead you to believe. She does.

You have to be careful who you listen to…

January 25, 2019

Intermittent Fasting Plus Lower-Calorie Diet May Be Best

Can you say, “Mediterranean Diet” or “Jason Fung, M.D.”?

This new study’s findings are consistent with both.

“Overweight women who ate a lower-calorie diet and fasted 3 days a week lost more weight and had better cardiometabolic markers than women who only reduced their calorie intake, or only fasted, or did neither in a small, 8-week randomized trial.

“Obese women who followed a diet in which they ate 70% of their required energy intake and fasted intermittently lost the most weight,” said lead author Amy T. Hutchison, post-doctoral researcher, Adelaide Medical School, University of Adelaide, Australia, in a statement from her university.”

December 22, 2018

The Mediterranean Diet Again – This Time Re: Depression

Junk Food Diet Raises Depression Risk

December 21, 2018

Nutrients in Blood Linked to Better Cognition and Brain Connectivity in Older Adults

…on the Mediterranean Diet!!!

“The basic question we were asking was whether diet and nutrition are associated with healthy brain aging,” Barbey said. “And instead of inferring brain health from a cognitive test, we directly examined the brain using high-resolution brain imaging.”

 

 

September 29, 2018

Sure Enough, the cave man diet gives gives you cave man longevity. What else would you expect?

From The Blue Zone folks, reporting on a Lancet article…

On the other hand, The Mediterranean Diet gives you Blue Zones!

June 23, 2018

More on the Mediterranean Diet (with great references!)

https://www.olivetomato.com/benefits-mediterranean-diet-is-the-best-diet/

April 28, 2018

Eat Like a Greek and Lose Weight- Science Says So. 3 Strategies That Work

I follow this Blog for recipes and great information on The Mediterranean Diet, especially the Greek part of the Mediterranean Diet.

March 7, 2018

Two evidence-based healthy eating patterns: More Research; not News

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/893184?src=wnl_mdplsnews_180302_mscpedit_wir&uac=254030MJ&impID=1572061&faf=1

‘Participants received individual, in-person counseling from nutritionists on how to adhere to each of the two evidence-based healthy eating patterns. The vegetarian diet excluded meat and fish but included dairy and eggs.’ (emphasis mine)

‘This was the first “intervention study that follows the principles of evidence-based medicine, in a general population at low risk of cardiovascular disease, that compared these two beneficial diets,” Sofi told theheart.org | Medscape Cardiology.’

A healthy diet should be “nutrient dense; rich in vegetables and fruits, whole grains, legumes and nuts; low in refined grains and commercially processed foods with added sugars, saturated fats, and sodium; sustainable; culturally relevant; and enjoyable.”

‘Both diets had similar low calories and consisted of 50% to 55% carbohydrates, 25% to 30% fat, and 15% to 20% protein.

The participants ate a similar number of servings of cereals, fruits and vegetables, potatoes, sweets, and olive oil on both diets, but on the vegetarian diet they ate more legumes, nuts, eggs, and dairy products, as well as flaxseed and avocado (to compensate for the lack of essential fatty acids from fish).

Both diets were similarly effective for weight loss. After 3 months, the participants lost a mean of 1.88 kg and 1.77 kg while on the vegetarian and Mediterranean diets, respectively.’

Although these diets should be investigated in larger studies in other populations, this research suggests that “a low-calorie healthy vegetarian or Mediterranean diet pattern may offer a possible solution to the ongoing challenges to prevent and manage obesity and cardiovascular diseases,” Anderson said.

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