Everett Chiropractic Center Blog

April 21, 2018

Breathing through the nose…

There are more Posts on this Blog about breathing than I can count, but here is new research with interesting linkages to our tai chi practices (basic breathing to relax instructions take place in the first session). In particular, breathing through the nose. This study may add more to the emotional connection. Whatever the scientific details and revelations, nothing could be more basic, more simple, or more profound than correct breathing (and using correct breathing to manage stressful situations).

One way to get a sense of the significance is to look at the Post on mouth breathing. Learning the implications of the extremes in one direction will help impress you of the importance of proper practice.

Summary: Olfactory system neurons appear to play a role in the connection between rhythmic breathing and emotional regulation, researchers report.

Source: University of Pennsylvania.

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March 28, 2018

Breath

Arefa Cassoobhoy, MD, MPH

DISCLOSURES

January 19, 2018

 

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“Hello. I’m Dr Arefa Cassoobhoy, a practicing internist, Medscape advisor, and senior medical director for WebMD. Welcome to Morning Report, our 1-minute news story for primary care.

In patients with asthma, breathing exercises are known to help. But training patients in breathing techniques takes time and expertise, so it’s not often utilized to manage uncontrolled asthma.

A recent trial[1] compared two methods of breathing retraining: self-taught, using a video; or three face-to-face sessions with a respiratory therapist. The training focused on diaphragmatic breathing, nasal breathing, and slow breathing, as well as controlled breath holds and simple relaxation exercises.

Compared with usual care, both methods of breathing retraining improved asthma-related quality of life. Although the interventions didn’t change measures of airway inflammation or obstruction, patients reported increased control over breathing and reduced need for medication. They also felt more relaxed.

So, for your patients struggling with their asthma, consider adding breathing retraining to their treatment. Even patients who don’t have easy access to respiratory therapists can benefit from the self-taught video training. It’s a simple, low-cost option.”

The emphasis above is mine: this is all taught in your first tai chi class, and constantly repeated, and re-enforced, throughout each and every tai chi class. Most people, asthmatics or not, will benefit from learning diaphragmatic breathing, through the nose in a mindful way that produces relaxation.

July 29, 2017

The Importance of Breath

“For many people it seems difficult to believe that changing breathing patterns can have such significant impact on mental and physical health. Not to mention performance and recovery.
It is the lowest hangning fruit and very few poeple are picking it. Instead many are looking for complicated methods or become dependent of pharmaceuticals.”

– Paul Silfverstrale, Wudang Practical Tai Chi Chuan

Here is his recent Blog Post entitled Nasal Breathing: https://wudangtaichichuan.wordpress.com/2017/07/29/tai-chi-chuan-qi-nasal-breathing/

It compliments, perfectly, all that I have said on this Blog on the subject, including the very recent Post on mouth breathing (the problem).

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