Everett Chiropractic Center Blog

June 9, 2017

Foam Rolls

Filed under: Back pain, Exercise — Tags: , , , — doctordilday @ 1:54 pm

I am putting this here so that patients can find both the phone number and the description/item number to place Orders.

Power Systems

(800) 321-6975

Closed-Cell Foam Roller 36 in. Long X 6 in. diameter    $20.95

This may also be available on Amazon. I don’t know.

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April 8, 2014

The “Cost” of Back Injury Prevention

woods1

It probably doesn’t cost you as much as it is costing Tiger Woods not to prevent back pain injury, but it costs something.

Some might say that, given the prevalence of back pain in golf, it’s an unavoidable occupational hazard. That’s like saying that your mother or father had back pain so you must have inherited a bad back, and therefore, couldn’t avoid it.

Back injury prevention is very rarely taught effectively, in golf or anywhere else – at the lowest or the highest levels. And no more now than when your mother and father were coming up. It’s not just ‘use it or lose it’ that applies; if you don’t use it properly it’s just a matter of time before injury occurs.

Fortunately, it isn’t difficult to learn how to use your back properly. Just ask.

December 19, 2013

Functional Examination Follow Up

A week and a half ago I told the story of a patient who underwent a series of physical capacity tests to determine where she stands with regard to normals for her age and gender. I mentioned the surprising results and the implications of those results.
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Today she reported what she experienced after the tests. She was so sore she could barely walk with thigh muscle soreness. It took many days for her to recover. No other drama!!!

I mention this because this is the most perfect outcome we could have hoped for. First, (and this is a big deal every time anyone ever does physical testing on someone where there is even the slightest chance of over doing it) we (I) didn’t hurt her. She didn’t experience a relapse because of the demands of performing the tests. No small feat.

Second, we now know that we can use the results of the tests to fashion a workout that will be suitable, safe and yet productive. She has the confidence to do what is recommended because she knows that it’s safe; and she is motivated because she knows that doing what is recommended will definitely result in better stability in her spine – therefore she will have less pain and be able experience less pain even as she, at the same time, spaces her chiropractic visits further and further apart.

It really doesn’t get any better than that.

December 14, 2013

Rehabilitation, the Functional Reach, and Tai Chi

This is the so-called Functional Reach

This is the so-called Functional Reach

I saw the above illustration in an article on rehabilitation and couldn’t help noticing the similarity to Tai Chi Forms. (The implications for appreciating the rehab potential of Tai Chi are endless…)

I never studied Yoga at length but have noticed also that the more you look at the Yoga postures and the more you compare them to what is done in rehabilitation, the more you realize that one borrowed heavily from the other – and we all know which came first.

Now, and for the foreseeable future, there will be a similar trend toward “borrowing” elements of Tai Chi and Qi Gong for use in all kinds of other disciplines. I reviewed the recently published Harvard Medical School Guide to Tai Chi extensively. Toward the end of that review I mentioned the simplified series of “Tai Chi” exercises that the author and his authority created.

What is Tai Chi? is an interesting question. My teacher took a stab at it in his text Complete Tai Chi Chuan and made a good case for one answer. But there will be many others.

As with so many other things (Chiropractic for example) the answer to what something is largely ends up being what the authoritative current voice of the majority says that it is (or was, in some cases of historical revision). That’s sometimes a shame.

The value of a Traditional Tai Chi syllabus, or even a single Traditional Form, is often lost on the masses who swallow whats being served without ever knowing what they may be missing.

I teach from a Traditional syllabus. The Hand Form is a Long Round Form.

The Five Components of Tai Chi all reinforce each other in practice. As you get better with Push Hands, for example, other aspects of your Tai Chi training also improve. Weapons Forms help train Push Hands techniques.

Unlike other “classes” though, it takes some time and effort to actually learn Tai Chi, then you begin to enjoy the benefits of the daily practice of Tai Chi. Eventually, the effects accrue and you begin to see measurable results.

Join us Monday nights at 7 for class at Peak Health & Fitness to find out more…

May 28, 2013

The Harvard Medical School Guide To Tai Chi – A Book Review17

Single Seize The Leg

Raise Hands Step Up 2/2

Single Seize The Leg 2/2

White Crane Flaps It’s Wings 1/6

4. Active Relaxation

Moderation in Effort

“Tai Chi develops strength, flexibility, and increased range of motion, but it does so gradually, which may help minimize injury.” “Tai Chi is safe even for those who start training quite late in life (even in their nineties) or those who have serious neuromuscular skeletal conditions, such as fibromyalgia and arthritis.”

Active Relaxation

“Relaxation in Tai Chi is a much more active concept, and more functional too. Remember that Tai Chi was developed and is practiced as a martial art. Tai Chi classic texts, written largely as manuals for practical martial arts training, included phrases such as, ‘In practicing Tai Chi Chuan, the whole body relaxes.”

“One of the Tai Chi concepts that informs the idea of active relaxation is ‘Sung.’ Sung is considered a defining characteristic of Tai Chi.”

“In Tai Chi training, you learn to let things ‘relax’ downward naturally,”

About the Photos

Maintaining neutral spine and the knee rule…

May 20, 2013

The Harvard Medical School Guide To Tai Chi – A Book Review9

Grasp The Bird's Tail 1/4

Grasp The Bird’s Tail 1/4

Philosophical Influence

“Tai Chi’s roots are intertwined with multiple Eastern philosophies and religions, among which Taoism is the most prominent. The oral tradition of Taoism is believed to extend back in Chinese history to 3,000 B.C.E.”

“… it is very clear when reading Lao tau and other Taoist texts that several key principles of Taoism resonate with the practice, philosophy, and spirit of Tai Chi.”

Tai Chi in the West

“While historians have shown that many aspects of Chinese medicine and culture, including Tai chi came to the United States in the 1800s during the building of the railroads, the main entry was in the 1960s.” One of the earliest and most prominent teachers to bring Tai Chi to the West was Cheng Man Ching. A student of Yang Cheng Fu, Cheng Man Ching was the perfect ambassador of Tai Chi for the West. Master Cheng was classically training in painting, poetry, philosophy, Chinese herbal medicine, and martial arts, the so-called five excellences.”

“In 1964 he came to the United States and started Shr Jung Center for cultural arts in New York…”

“In the early 1960s, even in large cities such as New York, Eastern practices were hard to find. There wree some martial arts (karate and judo), but most mind-body Eastern practices, even yoga, were still considered cult-like and in conflict with Judeo-Christian beliefs.”

“As the Chinese historian and scholar Professor Douglas Wile wrote, even to this day, “Tai Chi is China’s cultural ambassador to the world…Touching lives of more westerners, and perhaps more deeply, than books, films, museums or college courses, Tai Chi is often an entree` to Chinese philosophy, medicine, meditation, and even language.”

“Many of Cheng Man Ching’s senior students in Asia, including Benjamin Peng Lo, William Chen, and T.T. Liang, followed him to the United States and continued to study with him and help him teach new students.”

“A reflection of how successful the invasion [of Tai Chi] has been is World Tai Chi Day, organized by Bill Douglas.”

“In China, the opportunity to learn an internal art and work closely with a high-level master was a rare, once-in-a-lifetime event for most people.”

“… comingling also lead to new hybrids, sometime repackaged with new names, such as Tai Chi Yoga and Mindful Tai Chi. Because no single, sanctioned national organization currently is responsible for monitoring the development of Tai Chi training and teacher credentialing and, in the West, there is little political control over teaching practices prohibited in China due to political reasons, it is likely that the West will continue to serve as an important cradle for the development and evolution of Tai Chi.”

About the Photo

Notice the nearly 45° angle, the “line”, and the yin-yang hands. Also notice that my head is tilted back a little too far; it would have been better to raise the eyes more and tilt the head back a tiny bit less.

If you get the impression that I am picky about minute technical details with regard to form, I am. It isn’t necessary to get it that right all the time in every aspect and I don’t require perfection from students. It’s all a process and a matter of priorities and none of us are going to get it absolutely perfect. We just work on it, first to get the basics, then to polish and polish and polish. If polishing isn’t your thing that’s fine. For health purposes as long as you roughly get the line right, the knee rule right and the hip hinge right, none of the rest of it is dangerous and none of the rest of it will matter that much. You will still have just as much fun too!

May 19, 2013

The Harvard Medical School Guide To Tai Chi – A Book Review8

DSC_9814

Transitioning from Form of Seven Stars into Grasp The Bird's Tail

Transitioning from Form of Seven Stars into Grasp The Bird’s Tail

Philosophical Influence

“Tai Chi’s roots also are intertwined with multiple Eastern philosophies and religions, among which Taoism is the most prominent.”

“… it is very clear when reading Lao Tzu and other Taoist texts that several key principles of Taoism resonate with the practice, philosophy, and spirit of Tai Chi.”

Tai Chi in The West

While historians have shown that many aspects of Chinese medicine and culture, including Tai Chi, came to the United States in the 1800s during the building of the railroads, the main entry was in the 1960s. One of the earliest and most prominent teachers to bring Tai Chi to the West was Cheng Man Ching. A student of Yang Cheng Fu, Cheng Man Ching was the perfect ambassador of Ta ichi for the West. Master Cheng was classically trained in painting, poetry, calligraphy, Chinese herbal medicine, and martial arts, the so-called five excellences.” “In 1964 he came to the United States…'”

“In the early 1960s, even in large cities such as New York, Eastern practices were hard to find. There were some martial arts (karate and judo), but most mind-body Eastern practices, even yoga, were still considered cult-like and in conflict with Judeo-Christian beliefs, and many were kept somewhat underground.”

“As the Chinese historian and scholar Professor Douglas Wile wrote, even to this day, ‘Tai Chi is China’s cultural ambassador to the world… Touching lives of more westerners, and perhaps more deeply, than books, films, museums or college courses, Tai Chi is often and entree` to Chinese philosophy, medicine, meditation, and even language.”

“Many of Cheng Man Ching’s senior students in Asia, including Benjamin Peng Lo, William Chen, and T. T. Liang, followed him to the United States and continued to study with him and help him teach new students.”

“A reflection of how successful the invasion has been is World Tai Chi Day, organized by Bill Douglas.”

“In China, the opportunity to learn an internal martial art and work closely with a high-level master was a rare, once-in-a-lifetime event for most people.”

“This comingling also has led to new hybrids, sometimes repackaged with new names, such as Tai chi Yoga and Mindful Tai Chi. Because no single, sanctioned national organization currently is responsible for monitoring the development of Tai Chi training and teacher credentialing and, in the West, there is little political control over teaching practices prohibited in China due to political reasons, it is likely the West will continue to serve as an important cradle for the development and evolution of Tai Chi.”

About the Photos

In the performance of almost any given Tai Chi Style, there is an “opening” and “closing” of the posture, sometimes more than once for a given Style. Here you can see that as the hands are drawn down, toward the left hip, and the weight shifts back and down there is closing. The right foot then steps out, and when the weight shifts onto that right foot there will be an opening.

Notice too, that as part of the alignment of the waist, neck and head, where ever the hips (or belly button if that helps) are pointing the head is also pointing in that same direction. This true in general and throughout Tai Chi right up until it isn’t true any more:-)

I have mentioned that my Forms are large. One way to think of how large would be too large is to consider that peripheral vision is being trained and, in general, if the hands were to go outside the field of peripheral vision, that would be too far.

May 18, 2013

The Harvard Medical School Guide To Tai Chi – A Book Review7

Form of the Seven Stars

Form of the Seven Stars

Healing Arts Influence

“Tai Chi shares a common historical pathway with the development of traditional Chinese medicine, which includes prescriptions of exercise and lifestyle, along with herbs, diet, acupuncture, massage, and other modalities for maintaining health and longevity.”

“Movements in the contemporary Tai Chi forms, such as ‘Snake Creeps Down,’ ‘Crane Cools Its Wings,’ and ‘Step Back to Repulse Monkey,’ reflect and extend this tradition of observing nature, mimicking elements of naturalistic, animal-like movements, and applying them to health and self-defense.”

“To be a successful, enduring, high-level marital artist, practitioners needed to be healthy in body and mind.”

“A line in the a Tai chi classic poem entitled, ‘Thirteen Posture Song’ reads, ‘What is the purpose of this discipline? To lengthen one’s life, extend one’s years, and to give one an ageless springtime.”

“A noteworthy development in Tai Chi’s widespread promotion for health was the development of a 24-posture simplified form, or the Beijing Form. This form was developed in 1956 by the National Physical Culture and Sports Commission of the People’s Republic of China as part of the drive to standardize Tai Chi training for social reform and sport. This form was part of a national fitness program. Today you can go to parks across China and see millions practicing Tai Chi. This practice is clearly part of the country’s health maintenance system, and many Chinese hospitals integrate Tai Chi into rehabilitation.”

About the Photo

Here we transition from Beginning Tai Chi Style into Form of the Seven Stars. This photo isn’t a perfect illustration of the Form of the Seven Stars Style, but it is very close and will work for our purposes.

Here we are introduced to the “Cat Stance” with the weight on one foot which is at a 45° angle, and the other foot angled 45° in the other direction (so that that feet form a 90° angle) with the toe touching the ground but without any weight on that foot. Now you have a “full” (Yin) leg – the one you are standing on, and an “empty” (Yang-because it has the potential for movement) leg. The heels are closer together than is shown here.

Form of the Seven Stars is a famous for static training. It is also the starting point for a Moving Push Hands Drill by the same name. This two-person drill trains a way of stepping (Seven Star Step), deflecting and pushing/striking. The Seven Star Step forward is done by stepping forward 45° (e.g., to the left) onto one foot, then forward 45° to the right onto the other foot, always keeping the knees bent, and the neutral spine. Backward is a reverse movement, pushing off of the front foot backward turning to the 45°, then off of the other foot back 45° in the other directions so the you zig-zag back and forth while moving either forward or backward; pushing as you step forward, deflecting as you step backward. It also teaches timing and distance as well as cardiovascular fitness.

April 5, 2013

Who Benefits Most?

Recently patients have come in the office and we have reviewed and revised their home exercise program, as we often do. A couple of these patients have been frustrated by the fact that they have so much trouble performing the simplest tasks. They either can’t keep their balance, can’t quite “get” how to do it, are not coordinated, or they get started but then loose their concentration and get lost in the movement, not knowing quite what comes next.

These are wonderful signs! With a little more simplifying here and a little supervised practice there, they do get it. With encouragement these patients begin to realize that they will gain the most, benefit the quickest, and make the most progress compared to someone who has no trouble and needs little or no supervision once they get the picture and hear the instructions.

On all levels, from understanding what is being said, to performing the movements and internalizing the sensation of the exercise, these patients that initially have so much trouble, without exception have the most profound recoveries.

This the main thrust of a personalized exercise program: finding the match between what you need to do, what you can do, and what you will do. Doing that now, at this point, and later when you are at a different level. Being able to put in front of you just what you need, right when you need it, to get you where you want to be. It’s one of the most fun things about clinical practice. And when it comes to exercise, if you really want to make the progress, I can always figure out a way. Always.

It’s easy to feel intimidated, scared of a relapse, and even like you are a little “slow”. That’s Ok. It’s perfect in fact. New research in the field of exercise showing the effects on the brain now help us understand why a guy who can’t do the Cross-Crawl pattern is able to get off the medication for his mental condition once he is helped to practice that pattern for a while. The Mind and the Body are connected!

In fact we all feel inempt when we begin Tai Chi. Everyone of us. And we don’t like it… at first. But watching and feeling; sensing and experiencing the progress we make over time, that’s the really fun part. Feeling fitter is a wonderful feeling. Eventually, we become comfortable going through that process and we end up signing up for more, and more, and more. First it’s the Hand Form. Then Push Hands. Then the Left Handed Hand Form. Then The Spear. Then… Then…

It’s the same process with the Gym Ball work; the same with the Stabilization exercises. It’s the same with everything.

Stay with it. Ask for help. Keep coming back to review and revise. Ask for more help. Have fun!

December 10, 2012

Finding Time to Workout

Core!

The kettlebell folks started a Blog. Their first post starts out like this:

“Our lives are exceedingly busy.

Time is a commodity that we can ill afford to waste. There are many occasions when we only have a small window of opportunity to train. You only have 35 to 45 minutes to train. You have to get your workout in. You’ve worked very hard to attain your level of fitness and you want to keep it. What can you do?

Here’s a great workout combining body weight and kettlebells.”

Then the author Phil Ross goes on to describe a couple of sample workouts that most of us couldn’t do if we had a week to do them. That’s not the point. Re-read his quoted introduction. That thought process is so important whether you are a star athlete or recovering from your most recent bad back episode. Same exact thought process applies.

That’s why it’s important to know, physically, where you are, where your fitness program is taking you and the very next step you need to take to get there. Setbacks are costly in terms of time and progress. Read my Post on the “fitness line.”

Start where you are. If you have a history or risk of back pain then begin with spine stabilization exercises (the Big Three, then bridging, side bridging, and the lunge). Only after several weeks and full competence at these should you progress to the basic whole body exercises such as pull up, push up, squat, etc. or some variation of these. Look for exercises that ALSO improve your breathing, your posture, coordination, balance, flexibility, strength, endurance, etc. and balance out whatever you do for a living: if you sit all day for a living think about whether riding an exercise bike really makes sense; if you walk all day think about whether the popular cardio walking machines are a smart choice.

If you do whatever it is that you are doing for two weeks before adding anything to it or switching out one thing for something harder you will be much much safer.

In the end choose exercises that have the greatest number of benefits for each minute you spend doing it. The one-dimensional exercises that offer only a single or couple benefits are eating up valuable time. Time you won’t have to do other important stuff.

The number one reason people give for not exercising (whether quitting or never getting started) is that they don’t have the time. So be safe first, and use your time wisely second. That approach will keep you in the game and off the injured list:-)

February 13, 2012

Back Pain Brain Power

Last week a guy named Brian King, PhD gave a presentation called How The Brain Forms New Habits: Why Willpower Is Not Enough. It was sponsored by the Institute for Brain Potential.

Helen attended and said that it was very good. I had a chance to review the notes and found one page that I will share parts of here. I bring this to your attention because it may be interesting to you (it is to me), and because everything that is said about the brain forming habits as it relates to smoking, or addictions, or anything else, also applies to your back pain and the purpose of doing your spine exercises. Not everyone makes that connection, but it is precisely why posture and movement, keeping the joints that I adjust moving, etc. is so critically important to restoring and maintaining health. It is also why screenings that catch poor movement or posture habits are important. (Helen mentioned that Dr. King said it takes 90 days of doing a new activity for it to become the new habit. I was reminded of the Benjamin Franklin story and his 21 days to break bad habits and replace them with good ones.)

First, here is the definition given for “mindfulness” which is interesting because I don’t remember hearing it as a part of a definition of mindfulness, but as a consequence of the meditative process. Mindfulness: Ability to experience thoughts, feelings and situations without judgement or response. Acceptance. Improvements in acceptance/mindfulness are associated with recovery from many disorders of overconsumption and over-avoidance.

Take Home Point
Efforts to quit of moderate bad habits will fail if they focus solely on depriving oneself of doing the habit. Even with short-term success, the habit system will readjust to the new, more reward deficient environment, and you will become more driven for immediate gratification and likely relapse.

Take Home Point
Ending a bad habit is not about taking away something that provides pleasure or relief. It is about optimizing you life patterns so that you are as healthy and happy as possible. Bad habits inherently lead to poor health – physical and emotional sickness. Replacing bad habits with healthy habits will improve your life. But iit is absolutely necessary to REPLACE your bad habit, not deprive yourself.

Take Home Point
Positive Psychology: Use your strengths to start you down the path. Success will build your confidence and self-efficacy for next steps. Success will enrich your life to reduce impulsivity and make habit changing easier.

Don’t start with the scariest hardest part. Take whatever little step seems easy or fun to you right now. Mastering that step will reshape your brain and new steps will start to seem manageable. Avoid the “get discovered by Oprah” plan. Don’t get stuck on the goal, focus on walking down the path.

The path of health. A great image. You will find it throughout this Blog. Enjoy!

May 18, 2011

Beginning Tai Chi Style for Safe Bending & Lifting

Master Wu Tunan doing tai chi at the age of 100 – something to think about (Not our style of tai chi BTW, but here is a 1937 clip of someone doing Wu Style Tai Chi (nearly the same as ours).

Tai Chi Hand Forms are a series of “Styles” performed in a sequence. Think of Styles as Postures – identical to Yoga “Poses.” Most people think of Tai chi as a continuous movement practice: holding static (still) Postures is also a part of Tai Chi practice. In Tai Chi a “Style” encompasses both the static posture as well as a movement which includes an “opening” and a “closing’ component – as well as other aspects.

Three keys to safe bending and lifting are the Neutral Spine, Knee Rule, and Hip Crease (described in detail in this post). Here I will describe how these critical concepts and principles of safe biomechanics are trained in just one of the Tai Chi Hand Form Styles, “Beginning Tai Chi Style.” (Incidently, this is the third Style in the sequence, not the first: correct breathing, focused awareness and standing up straight come first:-))

From a neutral standing position, feet under hips, upright with an elongated spine, and the arms hanging naturally at the side, the arms come up and out to the front, back toward the body and down the front of the body, palms down; as the hands descend, the knees bend (following the knee rule), the hips sink back and down, and the spine stays in neutral alignment (straight but with the natural curves – think of a Bow as in Bow and Arrow – the Bow has a curve or curves but it also has a straight line).

The "Line" (Ignore the hands, this is not Beginning Tai Chi Style)

As the arms go up and move through their circular arc, the shoulders relax and sink. As the hands and hips simultaneously descend, ending their decent at the same time, the hands separate. They follow a path around the body and back, eventually circling back around to the front – as the hands separate, the weight of the body is shifted to one side (in the Right Handed Form it would be to the right).

With the weight shifted to one side and the hands as far back as flexibility allows, the hands now move forward. As the hands go forward the foot without weight on it steps forward. The leg remains straight, and the foot is set down without any weight on it – the heels are remain shoulder width apart, in other words the foot steps straight ahead. This is Back Stance.

Back Stance: Neutral Spine w/ Hip Crease

The body and the left foot rotate to the right 45* while the hands trace an arc to the right ending at the right hip. All the weight is still on the right leg. From this position the weight shifts from the right leg to the left leg as the right hand pushes straight forward and the left hand accompanies it.

When all the weight rests on the left leg, the right (rear) leg is straight, the heel remains on the ground – the force of the shift comes from pushing through that rear heel. The spine is still in a straight “line.” The neck and head are also an extention of this “line” (you are looking as if over a set of glasses, not tilting your head back). The nose, the right hand, and the knee are in a the same plane.

This is Front Stance, the foot turning part is situational: not part of basic Front Stance. This is also the position of static posture for training this Style.

Front Stance: Neutral Spine & Knee Rule (Ignore the hands, this is not Beginning Tai Chi Style)

By adding the breathing, focused attention and conscious relaxation, and the fact that the hamstring muscles are stretched in the Back Stance and the hip flexor and calf muscles are stretched in Front Stance, you can see that there is a lot going on here.

I mention all this detail only to illustrate that in just this one Style at the very beginning of the Hand Form, you have the opportunity to train and practice correct lifting body mechanics, to learn whole body movement, to develop flexibility, strength, muscular endurance, balance, coordination and alignment. You can learn this in your first hour of Tai Chi practice – most of it anyway. Enough to practice your self at home afterward.

With practice you would get better, more relaxed, more flexible, stronger. As you gain confidence and competence, you can bend the knee more, and get even more flexible and even stronger.

This Style teaches so much. Once you have learned this Style you can practice Tai Chi walking as s drill. Moving from Back Stance to Front Stance, stepping, shifting the weight by pushing off the back heel, and learning to use the whole body to move. When it comes time to bend and lift you will be safer in every way.

By practicing this Style along with Tai Chi walking you will gradually discover all the areas of your body that tense up unnecessarily during these movements, and you will consciously relax them – through practice. Eventually, you will cease to tense up any muscles that are not required during the movement. Think about how efficient you will become; think of the energy you will save.

By stressing correct alignment during this practice you will develop the habit of neutral spine, the habit of following the knee rule, and the habit of the hip crease. These will become unconscious, automatic and normal for you.

Consider that in a 15 minute Long Round Hand Form you will step forward and back into and out of front and back stance many many times from all different angles and with dozens of simultaneous arm and hand gestures. The Form builds in complexity so in the beginning – before Beginning Tai Chi Style, you learn abdominal breathing, you learn to stand up straight – extending the head upward while keeping the chin down; and extending the tailbone downward without reversing the normal lower spine lordotic curve. You learn to have just a little bit of Yang in your Yin – the Tai Chi at Rest Style.

As the Form progresses the demand for flexibility, balance, coordination and strength increases gradually. By the time you get to the kick section, standing on one leg moving the other leg and both arms while turning the body is within your capability: a challenge, but possible.

The mental demands of remembering what comes next offer a means of focusing your attention. Being present is critical to tai chi practice and to safe bending and lifting. You have to pay attention. And that becomes a habit as well.

BTW, I didn’t mention how this one beginning style also helps to improve your shoulder range of motion – especially stretching out the front of the shoulders and chest where most people are tight from slumping over computer screens and steering wheels. Think about what 15 minutes of Tai Chi Hand Form could do for you.

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