Everett Chiropractic Center Blog

May 16, 2018

Seth Godin Nails It… Again (As Usual)

The triumph of everyday design

Luxury goods used to be better. Better than the alternatives.

The best-made clothing, the best saddle, the most reliable luggage. The top of the market was the place people who cared needed to go to buy something that had the highest performance.

Today, though, a Toyota is a better car than a Bentley. More efficient, more reliable. The Vertus phone was a joke, and no one needs a $200 mouse when a $9 one is faster and easier to use.

I spent some time at a high-end hotel on a recent gig. The light switches were complicated and didn’t work quite right. The door handle was awkward. The fancy faucets sprayed water on whoever was standing in front of the sink. All expensive, none of it very well-designed.

As materials have gotten cheaper and easier to find, it’s design that matters. And the market is demanding better design–which is easy to copy and easy to improve.

Expensive is not the relevant metric, utility is.

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February 4, 2018

Seth Nails It: The Super Bowl is for Losers

http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/2018/02/the-super-bowl-is-for-losers.html

Now I know why no one is answering their phones right now…

 

 

March 17, 2015

Seth Godin’s Blog Post – Too Important Not To Repeat

The one who makes things worse 

Every committee or organization has at least one well-meaning person who is pushing to make things more average.

“On behalf of the masses, the uncommitted, the ones who don’t care, we need to dumb this down, smooth out the edges and make it more average. We need to oversimplify it, make it a bit banal, stupid even. If we don’t, then some people won’t get the joke, won’t be satisfied, or worse, complain.”

And, by amplifying the voice of the lizard brain, he gets under our skin and we back off, at least a little. We make the work a little more average and a little worse.

This is the studio executive who demands a trite plot, with the usual stereotypes and tropes, played by the usual reliable actor types.

This is the record producer who wants the new song to sound a whole lot like the last song.

This is the NGO executive who fears that the new campaign will offend some minor donors…

Yes, it’s true that the remarkable, edgy stuff we wanted to make wasn’t going to be embraced by everyone. But everyone is rarely the point any more.

In the service of honest communication, perhaps the one who makes things worse should acknowledge that this is what he does for a living. That way, if we want things to be a little more average, we’ll know who to ask.

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