Everett Chiropractic Center Blog

June 11, 2019

Jason Fung, M.D. – Excerpt from “The Diabetes Code”

page 149 and 150

“…meta-analyses reviewing all the available literature up to 2016, including twenty randomized controlled trials, could only conclude that ‘there is no significant evidence of long term efficacy of insulin on any clinical outcomes in T2D (type 2 diabetes). However, there is a trend clinically harmful adverse effects such as hypoglycemia and weight gain.’ In other words, insulin treatment, including medications that simulate only the glucose-lowering properties of insulin, carries no perceptible benefits and significant risks. Insulin is “significantly more harmful than other active treatments.” (Emphasis mine!)

If you are on insulin or pre-diabetic you might want to go back and read that again, meanwhile… there is more.

page 150

“A similar review in the Journal of the American Medical Association that included all relevant trials up to 2016 found that none of the drug classes considered, including metformin, SUs, TZDs, and DPP-4 inhibitors, reduced cardiovascular disease or other complications.”

“While the scientific evidence is crystal clear, diabetes guidelines are slow to reflect this new reality. “… 95 percent of published guidelines endorsed the use of diabetes drugs despite the nonexistent benefits.”

“The classic medical treatment, which relies almost exclusively on pharmaceuticals to reduce blood glucose, can therefore best be described as how not to treat type 2 diabetes.”

“Following the low-fat, calorie-restricted diet and increasing exercise have long been the recommended lifestyle treatment for type 2 diabetes. There is only one problem with this seeming common sense advice. It doesn’t work at all.”

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May 31, 2019

Jason Fung, M.D. : Newly Published Research

I put this under ‘Jason Fung, M.D.’ on the Blog because it is new, and because it is research on Diabetes. But it has nothing to do with him: unless you have read his books and recognize a pattern.

This is ‘research’ in which we are supposed to read the headline, but never actually digest the small print – and it is written in such a way that it is not easy to digest even if you can. Read the last sentence of this Post. Dig into the article only if you think that you can appreciate what is, and what is not, being said. Then disregard all of it and go back and re-read Jason Fungs’ books.

Taken from Medscape

New Diabetes Cases in US Fall by 35% After 20-Year Rise

Miriam E. Tucker

May 30, 2019

“Rates of diagnosed diabetes in the United States may finally be declining but overall numbers remain high, new findings suggest.

The analysis of data for an almost 40-year period (1980-2017) from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) was published online May 28 in BMJ Open Diabetes Research and Care by Stephen R. Benoit, MD, and colleagues from the Division of Diabetes Translation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, Georgia.

After nearly a two-decade increase in both prevalence and incidence of diagnosed diabetes in the United States, the prevalence — the number of people living with diagnosed diabetes — has stabilized for the past 8 years and there has been a decrease in incidence, driven mostly by that seen among non-Hispanic whites.

This reduction means new cases declined by 35% from 2008 to 2017, a sign, perhaps, that efforts to stop the nation’s diabetes epidemic are working, say the researchers.

However, they caution, “Causes of the plateauing of prevalence and decrease in incidence are unclear and although the trends are encouraging, the overall burden of diabetes remains high and warrants continued intervention and monitoring.””

March 29, 2019

Excerpts From “The Diabetes Code” By Jason Fung, M.D.

page xvii

“Your doctor may prescribe a medication such as insulin injections or perhaps a drug call medformin, to lower blood glucose, but these drugs do not rid the body of excess glucose. Instead, they simply continue to take the glucose out of the blood and ram it back into the body. It then gets shipped out to other organs, such as the kidneys, the nerves, the eyes, and the heart, where it can eventually create other problems. The underlying problem, of course, is unchanged.”

page xviii

“The more glucose you force your body to accept, the more insulin your body needs to overcome the resistance to it. But this insulin only creates more resistance as the cells become more and more distended. Once you’ve exceeded what your body can produce naturally, medications can take over. At first, you need only a single medication, but eventually it becomes two and then three, and the doses become larger. And here’s the thing: if you are taking more and more medications to keep your blood glucose at the same level, your diabetes is actually getting worse.”

Writing more about the problem is getting too depressing. In general I do not like writing about problems at all: I focus on what causes health and talk about that. In this case there is a sinister element to the whole business of diabetes management that I was going to share. To be convincing that needs background. Read the book.

Starting tomorrow (or soon – not making any commitments:-) I will share excerpts that deal with the solution to the problem. It is so easy, so simple, and so accessible, that everyone should at least know about it. Then their choices are “informed”. And that is what health care is supposed to be about.

March 26, 2019

Excerpts from “The Diabetes Code” by Jason Fung, M.D.

page xvi

“When there’s too much glucose in the blood, insulin does not appear to be doing its usual job of moving the sugar into the cells. We then say that the body has become insulin resistant, but it’s not truly insulin’s fault. The primary problem is that the cells are overflowing with glucose. The high blood glucose is only part of the issue. Not only is there too much glucose in the blood, there is too much glucose in all of the cells. Type 2 diabetes is simply an overflow phenomenon that occurs where there is too much glucose in the entire body..”

“In response to excess glucose in the blood, the body secretes even more insulin to overcome this resistance. This forces more glucose into the overflowing cells to keep blood levels normal. This works, but the effect is only temporary because it has not addressed the problem of excess sugar; it has only moved the excess from the blood to the cells, making insulin resistance worse. At some point, even with more insulin, the body cannot force any more glucose into the cells.”

“What happens in the body if we do not remove the excess glucose? First, the body keeps increasing the amount of insulin it produces to try to force more glucose into the cells. But this only makes more insulin resistance, in what then becomes a vicious cycle. When the insulin levels can no longer keep pace with rising resistance, blood glucose spikes. That is when your doctor is likely to diagnose type 2 diabetes.”

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