Everett Chiropractic Center Blog

June 6, 2017

Hearing What Isn’t Said

 

Yesterday a new patient with a fairly typical bad low back story, told me that he wasn’t much for going to doctors. His current episode of back pain was just about over – the pain was worse when he made the appointment – and he is getting good physical therapy (they recommended he come here).

He had already told me about his lifestyle, which is good: diet conscious – with a full garden, fit, and active – a thoughtful guy. I suggested that there is another way to think of doctoring when it comes to chiropractic: more like exercise, something that he would never think of starting and then not continuing in the sense that he might not want to continue “going to doctors.”

It was an attempt on my part. Today my first phone message was him saying that he has had a change of heart, and cancelling his next appointment.

It occurs to me that he heard something that I did not say, namely that, like exercise, he would need to come in for chiropractic care often (like exercise). He missed the point, failed to stay in the conversation long enough to get clarification, and may end up missing out on the benefits of chiropractic care.

After that message my first patient arrived. A guy who started his care here 7 weeks ago and has no symptoms at all now – hasn’t for weeks. He has been shown and is compliant with doing the things that will help him hold his adjustments (keep the joints that I adjust moving properly). He was shown how to properly bend and lift (knee rule, neutral spine, and hip hinge) and how to get up and down off the ground safely (knee rule) – something that he needed. And he as been given the exercises he needs to work on spinal stabilization (core strength) if he wants to.

He now goes two weeks between visits, and soon will be going a month between visits. It is possible that someday he will go three months between visits, enjoying little to no symptoms, and fully confident that every day he is using his back properly and maintaining his health. He is using chiropractic like exercise: regularly, and for the right reasons.

 

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July 16, 2016

101 Benefits of Exercise.74

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Research overwhelmingly shows that regular exercise lowers the risk for many diseases, enhances the functioning of virtually every physiological system in the human body and improves psychological well-being.

74. Reduces workdays missed due to illness.

(Think about that for a minute, imagining that you are an employer…, while you contemplate many of the other benefits already mentioned that would directly affect your companies bottomline. Seems compelling, I wonder why it isn’t.)

I will be Posting a benefit every day – well, most days – from a list put together by Dr. Dave Phillips, M.D. He is an M.D. from Atlanta, GA who specializes in Sports Medicine. As a former All-American swimmer he knows a few things about exercise. He is also on the JuicePlus+ Health Advisory Board. He is also all over YouTube doing videos on JuicePlus+, exercise, and other health-related topics.

You can be healthier: this is list of ways exercise affects the body; think of them as motivational if you like.

July 13, 2016

101 Benefits of Exercise.72

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Research overwhelmingly shows that regular exercise lowers the risk for many diseases, enhances the functioning of virtually every physiological system in the human body and improves psychological well-being.

72. Maintains or improves joint flexibility.

I will be Posting a benefit every day – well, most days – from a list put together by Dr. Dave Phillips, M.D. He is an M.D. from Atlanta, GA who specializes in Sports Medicine. As a former All-American swimmer he knows a few things about exercise. He is also on the JuicePlus+ Health Advisory Board. He is also all over YouTube doing videos on JuicePlus+, exercise, and other health-related topics.

You can be healthier: this is list of ways exercise affects the body; think of them as motivational if you like.

July 12, 2016

My Favorite Website

http://dennisdilday.juiceplus.com/content/JuicePlus/en/what-is-juice-plus/what-is-juice-plus.html

Every year more spectacular research!

And more stories of kids and adult patients getting great results.

February 1, 2016

Chiropractic Verses Back Surgery

Chiropractic Care vs Back Surgery by Premier Health Chiropractors

July 1, 2015

Tai Chi, There’s More (fun) To It Than You Might Realize

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December 22, 2014

Another “How Not To Bend Over” Photo, This Time From The WSDOT

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I suppose WSDOT stands for Washington State Department of Transportation, but it doesn’t matter. I found the photo on the website of a large organization dedicated to safety. This employee is all decked out with safety vest, chaps, safety boots (with steel toes no doubt), a helmet, eye protection, gloves and long sleeves, so he’s good to go right?

NO! He doesn’t know how to bend over. He is both flexed in the lumbar spine and slightly twisted. Worse he is doing a job that will require him to hold that position for what looks like a relatively long time.

He is a perfect poster child for low back injuries. Assuming that that posture is the norm for him (and why wouldn’t it be?), his back injury future is as predictable as rain in Seattle. It’s just a matter of when.

He is not a firefighter, the subject of a Study that I mentioned the other day concluding that weak backs get injured and that a worksite exercise program could strengthen those very same weak backs. But it doesn’t really matter what job we talk about.

Last week I watched two roofers put a roof on the neighbors building. Same. The week before I took a First Aid & CPR/AED Course from someone who demonstrated the same poor lifting and bending techniques.

So a weak back getting injured, especially in a firefighter is kind of a no-brainer. And it’s understandable that employers wouldn’t want to take responsibility for their employee’s strength training (lots of reasons for that and a meaningful conversation could be had). But here’s the deal, employees are going to have to bend and lift no matter what: weak or strong, right or wrong. Why not at least teach them proper technique?

Employers have a lot going on. Minimal compliance with State and Federal regulations is already a pain. All those Safety meetings taking up time; all those videos that have to be shown that talk about back injuries. Why would they do more, in addition?

Well, here’s why. The Safety meetings and the videos are not producing the results. The incidence of back injury just keeps going up; the costs continue to climb. It is more common than any other injury, more expensive, and more disabling. THE COST OF NOT DOING SOMETHING ABOUT IT IS UNTENABLE!

Here is another reason: It’s easy to teach someone how to bend and lift properly if you know how yourself.

And another reason: Once someone FEELS the difference and can perform proper bending and lifting, they will not go back to doing it wrong because they feel weak and know that it is risky. People will gladly comply.

And another reason: Every single time an employee bends over wrong and lift incorrectly, they are head toward their next (or first) back pain injury; every single time they do it correctly they are strengthening the movement pattern of safe bending and lifting and protecting themselves against back injury.

And another reason: Since more and more employers are offering “stretch & flex” classes first thing in the morning anyway, they could be focusing a little attention on this subject, both in terms of proper movement patterns and in terms of strengthening – if they wanted to. Many already think that they are, but the evidence does not support that.

Why would an employer even hire someone who couldn’t demonstrate proper bending and lifting technique for a job that is going to require that movement? Why wouldn’t an employer measure that in their employees and track it as a measure of their own risk? And once measured, why wouldn’t an employer want to do something to shift the degree of risk in the direction of safer, less risky? Many employers must thing that they are already doing all of this. I think they could do better.

December 6, 2014

Absenteeism: What are the odds?

How to guarantee that you will get back pain

How to guarantee that you will get back pain

Well according to a recent article in the journal Spine (1), there is a 22% increased chance a person will miss work if they have chronic low back pain. A person with chronic neck pain is 20% more likely to miss work on any given day than someone who doesn’t. (Saying that reminds me of a survey of 5,000 nurses, 83% of whom said that they were working with back pain at the time of the survey. That suggests a lot of “chronic” back pain among nurses anyway.)

Absenteeism is one of those “indirect costs” of back pain that is rarely calculated. When all the direct and indirect costs of back pain are factored in, back pain is #1: the most common job-related injury; the most expensive; and the most disabling.

It’s interesting that things are so bad that, for example, hospitals are required by legislation to have “policies or programs to decrease work-related injuries”. Like all the other safety regulations and risk management structure, there is a requirement to have the policy, the program, or the procedure, but no requirement to show improvement in that thing supposedly the subject of the policy: back pain injury. The prevalence of that just keeps going up. The company stays in “compliance” but when you look at how their employees move or the back injury statistics, it just keeps getting worse.

Why? I don’t know. The Risk Managers get to check off a box indicating the employee watched a video or went to a safety meeting (they’ve done their job); the safety guy/gal held a safety meeting and showed a video (they’ve done their job); the employee attended (so they have done their job).

But when it comes to back pain injury, the videos are not any good at teaching what to do. The booklets from the Department of Labor & Industries are no better (which is where employers should be able to look for leadership). So the focus is on what not to do – the physics of holding stuff too far away, etc. And… poor lifting and bending continues. Where ever in the company the pain of the cost is felt, it isn’t accessible. Because the indirect costs don’t show up anywhere as a line item, they are essentially invisible.

There is a way to move that is safer and less likely to result in injury.

There are ways of quickly, easily, and affordably evaluated how people move (so you can tell who does and who does not need training) (This is a measurement of risk!)

How to properly bend & lift (and perform other movements) can be learned and taught in a very short period of time by anyone with average intelligence, (think Safety Person at work…).

Call us at (425) 348-5207 if you or your employer would like to know how.

(1) Spine, July 1, 2014:39(15):1243-53

July 12, 2014

If Health Care Costs Really Mattered…

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“Evidence-based” is reference to a systematic preference for advocating for, offering, choosing and incentivizing those things that are most supported by the available scientific evidence. Safety, effectiveness and monetary value are the three highest values, ostensibly.

Imagine what health care would be like in this country if any of that were really the case.

The good news is that if your health really matters to you, the information is available. You can make healthy choices.

Here is one. (Don’t try reading the whole thing. Skim for the titles that interest you the most – it’s comprehensive.) There are some things, with science-based support, that really are not too good to be true, even though they appear to be. Like chiropractic care, Tai chi is one of those things.

June 17, 2014

It Is Reversible: Stop Fighting Disease and Start Pursuing Health At All Levels

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Medication or meditation?

May 29, 2014

“We’ve Got Your Back” Course Coming in June and August at the Everett Parks and Rec

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We’ve Got Your Back!

Learn the Three Keys to keeping your back safe and strong (“Lift with your legs,” isn’t one of them.) in just 90 minutes.

Find out which three muscles matter most in bending and lifting, and how to take care of them. Handouts will allow you to remember what you learn!

Use your back well hiking, golfing, doing Yoga and at work!

Learn how you can prevent the most common, most expensive, and most disabling work place injury!

When:

Wednesday, June 25th 7 – 8:30 p.m. Class # 84880
Wednesday, August 13th 7 – 8:30 p.m. Class # 84881

Where:

Lion’s Hall at Forest Park

Fee:

$24/class Class size is limited, and will fill fast, so register NOW!

Register:

Online: http//: signmeup.everettwa.gov
Phone: (425) 257-8300 ext. 2
On Site: Recreation Office at Forest Park

Accepted payment:

MasterCard, VISA, check or cash

Instructor:

Dr. Dennis Dilday, D.C., Everett Chiropractic (425) 348-5207
http://www.doctordilday.com dennis@doctordilday.com

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March 10, 2014

MAYO CLINIC RESEARCH URGES CORPORATIONS TO DO TAI CHI

Master Wang Visits From China

[Re-Posted because some things are worth repeating:-)]

Tai Chi is being recommended for corporate wellness by the Mayo Clinic and in Fire Chief, the nation’s premiere fire department journal, according to the World Tai Chi & Qigong newsletter. Below is a report of a recent study.

The implications of the study, one of the largest of its kind, are significant for businesses and other organizations that offer wellness programs for employees or members. … So, instead of expecting tired, stressed participants to run off pounds on the treadmill, Dr. Clark suggests organizations could offer them yoga, tai chi, meditation, stress management classes or sessions with a personal wellness coach that would help them reach overall wellness goals.

Read entire article:

Excerpts from the article…

ROCHESTER, Minn., Sep 07, 2011 (BUSINESS WIRE) — One simple question asking employees to rate their current stress level may help identify individuals who could benefit from wellness programs to reduce stress and improve resiliency and overall health, according to a Mayo Clinic study published in the September/October issue of The American Journal of Health Promotion. The implications of the study, one of the largest of its kind, are significant for businesses and other organizations that offer wellness programs for employees or members.

The study’s lead researcher Matthew Clark, Ph.D., a clinical psychologist at Mayo Clinic, will present his team’s findings at a free webinar as part of the American Journal of Health Promotion Authors’ Series, on Tuesday, Sept. 20, at 12:00 noon Central / 1:00 p.m. Eastern. To register, go to https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/418557305 .

Many organizations offer wellness programs for employees or members. The programs can cut health care costs and boost productivity. However, many people drop out or decline to enroll.

“Wellness programs and centers typically initially focus on physical fitness and weight loss,” Dr. Clark says. “Perhaps by addressing other domains of wellness — stress management, work-life balance, spirituality and resilience — employees might gain the confidence and skills to truly achieve better overall wellness.”

Mayo Clinic researchers surveyed 13,198 employees who joined a Mayo Clinic employee wellness center when it opened in 2008. Employees rated their stress levels on a scale of 0 to 10 and answered questions about quality of life, fatigue, exercise, diet, smoking and health problems.

High stress levels were reported by 2,147 employees. When compared to other employees, high-stress employees reported a lower quality of life, poorer health, less support, and more fatigue. They also were more likely to have high blood pressure, high blood sugar and high cholesterol, and to be overweight. The high-stress group had less confidence than their non-stressed peers in their ability to make changes to improve their overall health.

The study showed the biggest differences between stressed and non-stressed respondents were in fatigue levels after a regular night’s sleep and in current quality of life.

So, instead of expecting tired, stressed participants to run off pounds on the treadmill, Dr. Clark suggests organizations could offer them yoga, tai chi, meditation, stress management classes or sessions with a personal wellness coach that would help them reach overall wellness goals.

“There is no one best approach to manage stress. We are all unique,” Dr. Clark says. “But by bolstering resiliency, employees may be able to successfully make lifestyle changes and achieve wellness.”

“Stellar employees can be stressed about meeting exceedingly high personal expectations,” he says. They may be top performers, but their quality of life is diminished. “Surveys have shown that stress is a common workplace problem,” says Dr. Clark. “Our research acknowledges that stress affects many aspects of health, and it’s possible to easily identify who might benefit from resiliency training.”

SOURCE: Mayo Clinic

There is not much that I can add to all of that except to say that not all tai chi is the same, and not all tai chi teachers are the same. My first teacher didn’t teach The Knee Rule. He was having surgery on his knees about the time my current teacher corrected me. I have had no knee pain since.

DrD

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