Everett Chiropractic Center Blog

May 20, 2019

The Context of “Exercise” – The Recovery Phase

First there was when to stop.

Then Relief Care context.

Then Rehab, the transition.

Then “core” stabilization or strengthening.

I kind of backed into this series of Posts inadvertently. Initially, I wanted to address some of the issues that could come up in the consideration of why or why not to do an exercise – when to stop doing it.

But, years ago, I did want to do a series on this cycle (injury-relief-rehab-recovery-reinjury). I began with the story about my own back injury and how I progressed to full recovery. (It took 15 years and had almost nothing to do with any of the health care professionals I came in contact with – the rehab and recovery phases didn’t that is.)

So why is it necessary to talk about recovery at all: you are ‘recovered’ after all. Well, in a word: relapse. In the tissues of a significant injury, aging is going to take place faster than in the surrounding, uninjured tissues. That injured spot is a weak link. Now might be the time to take a more global look. To find out if there are other weaknesses that need to be balanced out. Finally, the phrase, “I just want to ‘get in shape'” makes sense. This part is about your longer term future. The point I would make here is the same one I have made all along: what you do should be guided by why you are doing it. Elsewhere (all over) this Blog I have written about setting goals, assessing where you are now, “progressing” in steps to where you want to be. That is all covered. Use the search box on this Blog, using whatever key words seem appropriate, to find a list of Posts. (Start with “progressions” to get started.) Here, too, there are all kinds of ‘normals’ that can guide you into exercises that will give you meaningful benefits safely. And normal is a worthy goal: most people are far from it. It will keep you healthy. How you get there is a journey. And you know about journeys… they all start with a single step:-)

If you need help, let me know.

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April 6, 2019

For Tai Chi Students: Fan Through The Back Application with Othmar

March 9, 2019

For Tai Chi Students: Stephen Wooster

Running Thunder Hand

March 3, 2019

For Tai Chi Students: Form (Cuong Sam)

March 1, 2019

“Follow The Breath to Enter the Zone”

I put that in quotes because it comes from a book by Patrick McKeown entitled, The Oxygen Advantage. I share it because it is almost the exact verbiage I have use to teach tai chi students how to breath – in their first class. He didn’t get it from me; and I didn’t get it from him. It is fundamental to healthy breathing, as a starting spot. In tai chi it is part of getting centered and grounded before embarking of the journey that is the tai chi Hand Form. On this Blog I have also talked endlessly about the benefits of proper breathing; and the consequences of not doing so.

Here are his words…

“Following the breath involves observing the cycle of each inhalation and exhalation, and is a simple and useful method of internalizing your focus while shutting out any unnecessary thoughts. …

… The breath is the bridge between the mind and the body

February 25, 2019

For Tai Chi Students: Applications

February 24, 2019

Seth Godin: Gosh this guy is good!

Telescopes and microscopes

It pays to look at opportunity with a telescope. It’s real, but it’s distant. The telescope brings it into focus and helps you find your way there. Telescopes are easy to find if you look for them.

And it often pays to look at trouble with a microscope. Not to get intimidated by the amorphous blob that could snuff out your dreams, but instead to look at the tiny component parts, learning how it is constructed and taking away its power. Once you realize how it’s built, you can deal with it.

February 23, 2019

For Tai Chi Students: Flying Oblique Application by Othmar Vigl

February 22, 2019

Box Breathing (Calms you down)

If the Navy Seals do it and first responders do it, it must be good, right? Here is a link on “Box Breathing”.

I am currently reading “Oxygen Advantage” by Patrick McKeown. In it he talks about breathing techniques that simulate high altitude training and high intensity training. He mentioned the best example of perfect breathing he has encountered: it was in an advanced tai chi person – big surprise.

It is all Tai Chi to me.

To learn more about the importance of breathing correctly: how, why, when, etc., come to tai chi class or search ‘breathing’ on this Blog. It really is important; it really is simple.

DrD

February 19, 2019

For Tai Chi Students: Yin – Yang

February 13, 2019

More is Better When Coordinating with Others

Think Tai Chi class when reading about this new research.

January 29, 2019

Train the Brain to Form Good Habits Through Repetition (10,000 reps)

 

In Tai Chi, in particular, and martial arts in general, it is known that you do not really have a skill until you have performed 10,000 repetitions of that skill. One reason for daily practice; and one reason Tai Chi is so repetitive in practice.

 

Summary: According to researchers, forming both good and bad habits depends more on how often you perform an action than the satisfaction you get from the action.

Source: University of Warwick.

You can hack your brain to form good habits – like going to the gym and eating healthily – simply by repeating actions until they stick, according to new psychological research involving the University of Warwick..

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